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The World, 'It Turned Out Right'

Climate
The World, 'It Turned Out Right'

Portugal filmmaker Gonçalo Tocha, as part of the Action4Climate video competition, produced the inspiring short film The Trail of a Tale, which is a monologue of a letter from the future written to our recent past, telling us that the world, "It turned out right."

The nearly four-minute video is captivating as the narrator tells us, the stranger, how things went right. Society gathered with a fundamental belief that the "purpose of the economic system is to improve the well-being for all within the limits of what the planet can sustain ... We had to deal with overconsumption first. The prices we paid for things had to reflect the social and environmental costs..."

Deciding to be "more self sufficient and produce more locally" and realizing the "false consumer promise of buying happiness," people in the new world had more time for themselves and their friends and family.

The film reminds the stranger of what life use to be like when "the world was divided by great wealth and extreme poverty ... the global economy was falling apart ... we were accelerating toward the cliff edge of catastrophic climate change."

I've watched a lot of short films about climate change, and this one does an incredible job providing hope for the future.

The Action4Climate video competition received more than 230 entries from 70 countries from students inspired to share their climate change stories. To watch other Action4Climate videos, click here.

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