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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
The Great Barrier Reef at Whitsunday Island, Australia. Daniel Osterkamp / Getty Images

The world's oceans and coastal ecosystems can store remarkable amounts of carbon dioxide. But if they're damaged, they can also release massive amounts of emissions back into the atmosphere.

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Melting ice in places such as Greenland could stop a critical ocean current. Paul Souders / Getty Images

The climate crisis could push an important ocean current past a critical tipping point sooner than expected, new research suggests.

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Like many other plant-based foods and products, CBD oil is one dietary supplement where "organic" labels are very important to consumers. However, there are little to no regulations within the hemp industry when it comes to deeming a product as organic, which makes it increasingly difficult for shoppers to find the best CBD oil products available on the market.

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Algal blooms from fertilizer pollution are among the causes behind global coastal darkening. Gooddenka / Getty Images

Coastal waters around the world are growing darker from pollution and runoff. This has the potential to create huge problems for the ocean and its marine life.

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The Milky Way seen from the Izu Peninsula, Japan, on the Pacific Ocean coast. Krzysztof Baranowski / Moment / Getty Images

When you look up at the Milky Way, you may be looking at stars surrounded by planets with oceans like ours.

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David Mark / Pixabay

By Douglas McCauley

This article is part of The Davos Agenda.

The year 2050 has been predicted by some to be a bleak year for the ocean. Experts say that by 2050 there may be more plastic than fish in the sea, or perhaps only plastic left. Others say 90% of our coral reefs may be dead, waves of mass marine extinction may be unleashed, and our seas may be left overheated, acidified and lacking oxygen.

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Whale sharks have unique spot patterns behind their gills that allow them to be individually identified using NASA pattern recognition technology. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

The oceans and space are two of the last frontiers of discovery. It is only fitting, then, that technology originally designed to help map stars imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope has now been adapted to match spot patterns on the world's largest fish, the whale shark, to help save it.

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New study finds worst-case global sea level rise projections will occur unless immediate action is taken. Kazi Salahuddin Razu / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A new study from Australian and Chinese researchers adds weight to scientists' warnings from recent United Nations reports about how sea levels are expected to rise dangerously in the coming decades because of human activity that's driving global heating.

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A Coca-Cola bottle pollutes a river in France. Alain Pitton / NurPhoto via Getty Images

In December 2020, a report found Coca-Cola was the top corporate plastic polluter for the third year in a row, meaning its products were found clogging the most places with the largest amounts of plastic pollution.

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Scientists recently discovered life deep beneath the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf in Antarctica. O.V.E.R.V.I.E.W. / CC BY 2.0

Scientists recently made an unexpected discovery while drilling for sediment on an Antarctic ice shelf.

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Close-up of white plastic bag with yellow smiley slowly drifting under surface of water with school of tropical fish. Andrey Nekrasov / Barcroft Media / Getty Images

By Alexandra McInturf and Matthew Savoca

Trillions of barely visible pieces of plastic are floating in the world's oceans, from surface waters to the deep seas. These particles, known as microplastics, typically form when larger plastic objects such as shopping bags and food containers break down.

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A new study finds that scientists can use fin whale song to help image the ocean floor. JG1153 / Getty Images

A study published in Science on Thursday found that it's possible to use fin whale song for imaging the structure of the Earth's crust beneath the ocean floor.

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Bottom trawling may soon be banned in some of England's Marine Protected Areas. Monty Rakusen / Getty Images

In a possible victory for UK oceans, four key areas of the seabed off England may soon be off-limits to bottom-trawlers.

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