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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A Florida manatee at Three Sisters Springs, Crystal River, Florida on Dec. 2, 2021. John Brandauer / Flickr
After long debate, officials in Florida have decided to test feeding wild manatees near Cape Canaveral. The move is unprecedented, as feeding wildlife is considered illegal.
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Vegetarians are responsible for significantly less greenhouse gas emissions compared to their meat-eating counterparts, a new study finds. itakdalee / iStock / Getty Images Plus
Cutting out meat from one’s diet is a popular option when somebody wants to reduce their carbon footprint. Now, new research finds that vegetarians — who may still consume some animal products, such as cheese or milk — are responsible for significantly less greenhouse gas emissions compared to their meat-eating counterparts.
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CASEZY / iStock / Getty Images

From lighting up the night when you return home to boosting security, installing solar flood lights is a great way to invest in your home’s functionality and safety. Solar flood lights harness their energy from the sun and don’t require wiring or electrical work, making installation a breeze even for renters. And thanks to waterproof designs and efficient LEDs, they offer a fix-it-and-forget solution to myriad lighting predicaments.

In this article, we’ll recommend four of the best LED solar flood lights and motion-detector lights on the market today.

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A biologist looks at microplastics found in sea species near Athens, Greece. on November 26, 2019. LOUISA GOULIAMAKI / AFP via Getty Images
A new study from Rice University has found that microplastic particles may allow bacteria to develop higher resistance to antibiotics. As microplastics are just about everywhere — in your takeout containers, tea bags, and clothing — the research is concerning.
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EcoWatch Illustration by Devon Gailey

Every year, there’s a debate on whether to chop down a real, evergreen tree for Christmas festivities, or opt for an artificial tree made primarily from plastic in a factory. According to Greenpeace, you should keep an artificial Christmas tree in use for at least 8 years — but preferably 20 or more — to keep its lifetime emissions to a minimum.

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Food discarded by markets in a dumpster in New York City. Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
In the U.S., more than one-third of food produced goes to waste. While these organic compounds may seem harmless to toss in a landfill, food makes up 22% of waste in landfills and emits greenhouse gases, namely methane, as it rots. For the first time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released a report detailing just how much of an impact the country’s food waste has on climate change.
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A wind energy park near Brandenburg, Germany. Patrick Pleul / picture alliance via Getty Images
As renewable energy technologies scale up, their cost can be hard to estimate. A new report from the University of Oxford’s Institute of New Economic Thinking notes that the cost of renewable energies may be less than previously thought.
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Training cows to urinate in one location could lower nitrous oxide emissions, researchers say. Rikkie Neutelings
It’s no secret that cows emit a lot of greenhouse gases. Aside from methane, their urine also emits nitrous oxide. In order to minimize these emissions, researchers are testing if potty-trained cows with control over their urinary reflexes can lead to lower nitrous oxide in the atmosphere.
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North Atlantic right whales. NOAA FIsheries / YouTube screenshot
The U.S. government has enacted a voluntary protected zone off the coast of New York City in order to protect critically endangered North Atlantic right whales as they make their way south for the winter.
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Wandering albatrosses in a courtship display on South Georgia Island, Antarctica. W. Perry Conway / Corbis / Getty Images

As temperatures continue to rise, albatrosses are "divorcing" in higher rates.

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A day octopus, also known as the big blue octopus, found in both the Pacific and Indian Oceans, at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California on May 27, 2021. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images
A new animal welfare law in the UK may soon recognize decapods, like lobsters and crabs, and cephalopods, like octopi, as sentient beings. The classification means that the government would officially recognize that these animals feel pain.
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An artist's rendering of Lakeview Village. Cicade Design Inc. / Courtesy Lakeview Village
Lakeview Generating Station was once a coal plant in Mississauga, a suburb of Toronto. But now, developers are reimagining it to become a mixed-use, lakefront village, where residents can walk or bike anywhere within the site in just 15 minutes.
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Javier Sánchez Mingorance / EyeEm / Getty Images

As winter comes around, many people begin to suffer from the dreaded chapped lips and dry, flaky skin. The instinct is to slather on the first lip balm or moisturizer you can find, but all those little plastic tubes and tubs add up. While you shouldn't neglect these products to keep your skin from cracking and hurting from the harsh weather, there are some ways to soothe your skin that are natural and sustainable. From staying hydrated to limiting those steaming hot showers, here are some eco-friendly remedies and preventatives for dry skin.

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