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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola is stepping up its green initiative by giving a makeover to its Dasani brand, which is the best selling bottled water brand in a country where bottled water is the best selling beverage.

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By Jessica Corbett

A new analysis from the nonprofit advocacy group Consumer Reports warns that American drivers could lose about $460 billion dollars in fuel savings if the Trump administration implements its proposal to gut federal fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards for passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plastic cup for a shake, a beverage cup for soft drinks and disposable plastic crockery from McDonald's lie in a garbage can in Berlin, Germany on June 28. Gerald Matzka / picture alliance via Getty Images

McDonald's ditched plastic straws in the United Kingdom and Ireland last fall and replaced them with paper ones made from recyclable materials. It turns out though the new straws can't be recycled. The plastic ones could, according to CNN.

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Verdura Resort is home to Google's camp. Verdura Resort

Google's seventh annual meeting of the minds, dubbed Google Camp, is happening at a seaside resort in Sicily and this year, it is dedicated to the climate crisis. Luminaries from tech, business, entertainment and politics descended upon the Italian island to discuss ideas and solutions for tackling the climate crisis at the three-day event that costs Google upwards of $20 million, according to Business Insider.

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Holiday Inn Express logo seen at the hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ronen Tivony / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

Could mini shampoo bottles be the next target in the war on plastic pollution?

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A field of crops grows in Brawley, California. Florence Low / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Despite the warning signs — climate change, biodiversity loss, depleted soils and a shrinking supply of cheap energy — we continue to push along with an economy fueled by perpetual growth on a finite planet.

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The European Investment Bank building (left) across from the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. Westend61 / Getty Images

When the calendar turns over to 2021, fossil fuel companies won't have the European Investment Bank (EIB) to turn to for loans anymore. The EU's lending arm has decided to use its money to help stop the climate crisis by no longer funding fossil fuel projects and to ramp up its investments in clean energy, according to Bloomberg.

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Jose Fuste Raga / Corbis Documentary / Getty Images Plus

By Jordan Davidson

Four automakers from three different continents have struck a deal with California and agreed to adhere to the state's stricter emissions standards, undercutting one of the Trump administration's environmental regulatory rollbacks, according to The New York Times.

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Beverage behemoths Coca-Cola and Pepsico have taken a stand against a trade association that actively works to restrict plastic bag bans. The two soft drink giants have announced that they will leave the Plastics Industry Association as a response to concerns that their membership in the group contradicted their commitment to reducing plastic waste and packaging, as Newsweek reported.

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Pawtuxett River flooding on March 30, 2010 in Warwick, Rhode Island. National Guard troops were activated in Massachusetts and Rhode Island where a state of emergency was declared. Darren McCollester / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In what one advocate called a "big win" for climate liability litigation, a federal judge on Monday remanded Rhode Island's lawsuit targeting 21 fossil fuel giants to state court, where the oil and gas companies are more likely to be forced to pay for their significant contributions to the global climate crisis.

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picture alliance / San Diego Union-Tribune / C. Neuman

By Andreas Knobloch

The U.S. has acquired quite a liking for the Mexican dip guacamole. Especially on the day of the Super Bowl, Americans devour the avocado-based dip in immense quantities. According to the Avocado Producers and Exporting Packers Association of Mexico (APEAM), 120,000 tons of avocados were imported by the U.S. for consumption during this year's Super Bowl alone. That's 20 percent more than in the previous year and four times the quantity of 2014.

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