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A zero-emission electric car in Vail, Colorado on July 31. Sharon Hahn Darlin / CC BY 2.0

By Simon Mui

States across the country are stepping up to make clean cars cheaper and easier to find. Colorado's Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC) voted Friday to adopt a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) program that will increase the availability of electric vehicles in the state, improve air quality and increase transportation affordability.

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Frederick Bass / Getty Images

States that invest heavily in renewable energy will generate billions of dollars in health benefits in the next decade instead of spending billions to take care of people getting sick from air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels, according to a new study from MIT and reported on by The Verge.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Solar workers tend to photovoltaic panels in Xuanhua District on Nov. 13, 2018 in Zhangjiakou, Hebei Province of China. Chen Xiaodong / VCG via Getty Images

By Josh Gabbatiss

Solar power has become cheaper than grid electricity across China, a development that could boost the prospects of industrial and commercial solar, according to a new study.

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By Sara Peach

Dear Sara,

I live in a city that does not have great transportation options, and I live far enough from my work that I am not able to walk or ride a bike. I have a 15-year-old car that I am looking to replace.

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The European Investment Bank building (left) across from the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg. Westend61 / Getty Images

When the calendar turns over to 2021, fossil fuel companies won't have the European Investment Bank (EIB) to turn to for loans anymore. The EU's lending arm has decided to use its money to help stop the climate crisis by no longer funding fossil fuel projects and to ramp up its investments in clean energy, according to Bloomberg.

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A solar plant above a pond at the mining subsidence area in Liuqiao Town in Huaibei, Anhui Province of China on Dec. 11, 2017. VCG / VCG via Getty Images

China is leading the way on renewable energy, having installed half the world's solar panels in 2017. But its transformative economic growth fueled by coal and other fossil fuels and its outsized manufacturing sector have coughed up so much air pollution that it has blocked adequate sunlight from reaching its solar panels, according to a new study published this week in Nature Energy.

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A rooftop solar system was installed at Philippine Science High School in Diliman, Quezon City in 2010. Gregorio B. Dantes Jr. / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

Manila's new mayor wants to turn the city's public schools into a living lesson in sustainability.

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A woman in Macomia, northern Mozambique assesses the damage after a baobab tree slammed into her home during Cyclone Kenneth on April 28. EMIDIO JOZINE / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A "staggering" new warning from a top United Nations official that climate crisis-related disasters are now occurring at the rate of one per week, with developing nations disproportionately at risk, provoked calls for immediate global action to combat the human-caused climate emergency.

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Pexels

Earlier this month, a study found that the U.S. had more capacity installed for renewable energy than coal for the first time.

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Waterloo Bridge during the Extinction Rebellion protest in London. Martin Hearn / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Money talks. And today it had something to say about the impending global climate crisis.

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Sam Cooper

By Sam Cooper

Thomas Edison once said, "I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power!"

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