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Despite fierce opposition from local homeowners, a section of the SUNOCO Mariner II East Pipeline cuts through a residential neighborhood of Exton, PA. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

To celebrate the 50th birthday of one of America's most important environmental laws, President Trump has decided to make a mockery out of it.

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A pillar measures the water level in a lake during a drought in Surin, Thailand. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / Moment / Getty Images

By Brett Walton

The world's business elite, apprehensive about turbulent geopolitics after a year of international turmoil, nonetheless sees the biggest risks to society in the next decade coming from changes outside boardrooms and parliaments.

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A fleet of flooded taxis are seen at the operator's submerged parking lot following overnight rain in Jakarta on Jan. 1. RALIA / AFP / Getty Images
While politics continue to cripple efforts to fight the planetary emergency, the science remains as unequivocal and irrefutable as ever.
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A resident walks carrying a child through floodwaters on a road in Antananarivo, Madagascar on Jan. 8, 2020, after heavy rainfall. MAMYRAEL / AFP via Getty Images

By Uwe Hessler

In its 15th Global Risks Report published on Wednesday, the World Economic Forum (WEF) has said that for the first time in the report's history, all of the "top long-term risks by likelihood" are environmental. While in the previous decade economic and financial crises were seen as most dangerous, the report has found that risk perceptions have shifted to extreme weather, environmental disasters, biodiversity loss, natural catastrophes and failure to mitigate climate change.

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The sun rises over the lagoon on Sept. 13, 2019 in Kivalina, Alaska. The coastal Alaskan village faces the warming of the Arctic, which has resulted in the loss of sea ice. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

The world's oceans just had their warmest year on record.

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Giraffes in the Serengeti. Harvey Barrison / CC BY-SA 2.0

The United Nations wants to stop the sixth mass extinction.

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Fewer than 300 wolverines are estimated to be left in the lower 48 U.S. states. Jarkko J. / CC BY-NC 2.0

By Tara Lohan

This is not a good time to be a wolverine.

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A Chinese paddlefish exhibited in the Museum of Hydrobiological Sciences, Wuhan Institute of Hydrobiology of Chinese Academy of Sciences. Alneth / CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientists have concluded of the largest freshwater fish species in the world is now extinct because of human activity.

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Watching the sun rise at Cosumnes River Preserve. Bob Wick / Bureau of Land Management California / Flickr / Public Domain

By John R. Platt and Tara Lohan

Let's be honest, 2019 was a rough year for the planet. Despite some environmental victories along the way, we saw the extinction crisis deepen, efforts to curtail climate change blocked at almost every turn, and the oceans continue to warm. We also heard new revelations about ways that plastics and chemicals harm our bodies, saw the political realm become even more polarized, and experienced yet another round of record-breaking temperatures.

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A photo of a drought. dasroofless / Flickr / License

Nearly 1,100 scientists, practitioners and experts in groundwater and related fields from 92 countries have called on the governments and non-governmental organizations to "act now" to ensure global groundwater sustainability.

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A pond in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge. Steve Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A new report shows that groundwater needed to construct Trump's border wall will increase the likelihood of extinction for eight species, as Newsweek reported.

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