activism
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activism

Amazon and other tech employees hold a walkout past the Amazon Spheres during the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Amazon illegally fired two employees after they publicly criticized the company for its lack of action on climate change and its failure to protect warehouse workers from the novel coronavirus, the National Labor Relations Board determined.

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An illustration of deep seabed mining. WWF

For the first time, major companies are adding their voices to the call for a ban on deep-sea mining.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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WWF activists light candles for Earth Hour in front of a darkened St. Basil's Cathedral on March, 27,2021, in Moscow, Russia. Mikhail Svetlov / Getty Images

Cities around the globe dimmed their lights for an hour on Saturday, to mark Earth Hour. The annual event organized by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) encourages countries to dim their lights for an hour starting at 8:30 p.m. local time.

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Feminist women from throughout the world take part in a Greenpeace organized march to call for the political and economic reforms needed to combat climate change while COP24 takes place in the city on December 8, 2018 in Katowice, Poland. Martyn Aim / Getty Images

By Nicole Greenfield

The climate crisis disproportionately impacts women—and women of color in particular. This is why women must lead on its solutions.

Last fall, two powerful hurricanes, Eta and Iota, slammed into Central America within two weeks of each other, causing massive flooding and landslides and affecting millions of people, primarily in Honduras and Nicaragua. Thousands were uprooted from their homes, and women, many with children in tow, suffered the greatest. The events followed a disturbing but familiar trend: The United Nations estimates that 80 percent of people displaced by climate change are women. And it's not just storms that affect them; researchers in India have found that droughts, too, hit women the hardest, rendering them more vulnerable than men to income loss, food insecurity, water scarcity, and related health complications.

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On Saturday, March 27, people around the world will celebrate the annual Earth Hour, albeit in a slightly different way.

This annual tradition, first launched by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and its partners in Sydney in 2007, involves participants from more than 180 countries switching off their lights on the last Saturday in March in order to call attention to the climate crisis and biodiversity loss. This year, the organizers are adding something extra: a virtual spotlight that can be shined on the Earth by sharing their video.

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Liquefied natural gas developer Annova LNG has cancelled a planned fracked natural gas terminal in southern Texas. Eric Middelkoop / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

In what Indigenous and environmental activists hailed as a testament to the power of grassroots organizing, a leading U.S. fossil fuel company on Monday announced the cancellation of a planned fracked natural gas terminal in southern Texas.

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Yale Climate Connections recommends March reading for Women's History Month on how women are tackling climate change.

By Michael Svoboda

To honor Women's History Month, Yale Climate Connections's March bookshelf presents a selection of new and recent titles on how women are changing the politics and prospects for action on climate change.

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A small group of masked Fridays For Future participants protest in Rome, Italy, on Feb. 19, 2021. Matteo Nardone / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Martin Kuebler

When Fridays for Future (FFF) takes to the streets on March 19, activists around the world are going to be doing everything they can to make sure the climate crisis stays in the news.

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Climate activist Edgar McGregor spent more than a year picking up litter every day at Eaton Canyon in Los Angeles. USMARINE0311 / Flickr / CC by 2.0

"I AM DONE!!! I DID IT!!!"

These were the words that climate activist Edgar McGregor tweeted after 589 consecutive days of picking up trash at a popular Los Angeles hiking spot.

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The Sunrise Movement launched its "Good Jobs for All" campaign that guarantees a good job to anyone who wants one and puts the country on a path toward a Green New Deal. Image Source / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

Amid the ongoing climate emergency and the devastating coronavirus pandemic that has resulted in more than 500,000 deaths in the U.S. alone as well as an economic meltdown that has left millions of people unemployed, the Sunrise Movement on Thursday launched its "Good Jobs for All" campaign to demand that lawmakers pursue a robust recovery that guarantees a good job to anyone who wants one and puts the country on a path toward a Green New Deal.

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By Jeff Turrentine

Tamara Lindeman certainly doesn't seem particularly anxious, or grief stricken, or angry. In fact, in a recent Zoom conversation, the Toronto-based singer-songwriter (who records and performs under the name The Weather Station) comes across as friendly, thoughtful, and a little shy.

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Matthew Micah Wright / The Image Bank / Getty Images

By Deborah Moore, Michael Simon and Darryl Knudsen

There's some good news amidst the grim global pandemic: At long last, the world's largest dam removal is finally happening.

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