conservation
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conservation

waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A surgical mask floats in the ocean. Eloi_Omella / Getty Images

By David Shiffman

As we enter what's hopefully the home stretch of the COVID-19 pandemic, it's time to take stock of how it affected every aspect of our world, to consider what happened, what could be done different to avoid those problems in the future, and what's next.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

Read More Show Less
An elephant in Zimbabwe. Letizia Barbi / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Charan Saunders

Last year the world reacted in shock when Namibia announced plans to auction off 170 live elephants to the highest bidder.

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Trending
A family of Asian small-clawed otters sit on a log. Tom Meaker / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Muntasir Akash

The smallest of the planet's 13 otter species finds its habitat shrinking every day. We know little about these mustelids — especially in Bangladesh, where I conduct my research — but they face a horde of threats.

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An endangered North Atlantic right whale is seen in New Brunswick's Bay of Fundy in Canada. Francois Gohier / VW Pics / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Endangered North Atlantic right whales gave birth in greater numbers this winter compared to the past six years — a promising sign for a species that's been driven to the brink of extinction due to human activity.

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A recent study found that cats kill more than one billion birds every year in the United States alone. fotostok_pdv / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Invasive species are causing increasingly costly damage, new research finds.

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A California condor at the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in southern California. Jon Myatt / USFWS

The California condor once ranged from Mexico in the south to Canada's British Columbia in the north, but hunting, habitat loss and poisoning drove the species to the brink of extinction.

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Trending
Nesting bald eagles. Mark Newman / The Image Bank / Getty Images

After being threatened with extinction, the American bald eagle population has quadrupled since 2009 — a swift recovery that Martha Williams, deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, calls "one of the most remarkable conservation success stories of all time," AP News reported.

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The presence of Florida panther kittens is a hopeful sign for species recovery. Carlton Ward Jr.

"How America's most endangered cat could help save Florida."

As its headline promises, National Geographic's latest feature on the endangered Florida panther explores the unspoken, symbiotic relationship between the big cats and the humans they must coexist with. The article also showcases intimate, rare photographs of the panthers, which took five years to capture.

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Trending
An African savanna elephant in Botswana. Charles J. Sharp / CC BY-SA 3.0

Africa's elephants are in trouble, and human activity is to blame.

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Green iguanas are among the high-risk, non-native species to be banned from Florida's animal trade. Travel_Bug / Getty Images

Despite public resistance, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission voted to ban the possession and breeding of 16 high-risk invasive species.

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Wildflowers attract pollinators, benefiting fruits and vegetables. Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

By Brian Lovett

As winter phases into spring across the U.S., gardeners are laying in supplies and making plans. Meanwhile, as the weather warms, common garden insects such as bees, beetles and butterflies will emerge from underground burrows or nests within or on plants.

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