climate-action
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climate action

Rise and Resist activist group marched together to demand climate and racial justice. Steve Sanchez / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Alexandria Villaseñor

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

My journey to becoming an activist began in late 2018. During a trip to California to visit family, the Camp Fire broke out. At the time, it was the most devastating and destructive wildfire in California history. Thousands of acres and structures burned, and many lives were lost. Since then, California's wildfires have accelerated: This past year, we saw the first-ever "gigafire," and by the end of 2020, more than four million acres had burned.

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A new report urges immediate climate action to control global warming. John W Banagan / Getty Images

A new report promoting urgent climate action in Australia has stirred debate for claiming that global temperatures will rise past 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next decade.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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Air France airplanes parked at the Charles de Gaulle/Roissy airport on March 24, 2020. SAMSON / AFP via Getty Images

France moved one step closer this weekend to banning short-haul flights in an attempt to fight the climate crisis.

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A woman is seen collecting drinking water in Satkhira, Bangladesh on March 20, 2021. Kazi Salahuddin Razu / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Sam Baker

What really makes this reporter's stomach churn thinking about climate change? Thawing permafrost. A scenario where it all melts, releasing copious amounts of CO2 and methane (it holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere holds right now), and there's no going back.

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If passed, a green amendment proposal could guarantee clean air and water for residents in Maine's constitution. gregobagel / Getty Images

Maine State Senator Chloe Maxmin doesn't identify as a "traditional Democrat."

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"The [Uncertain] Four Seasons" warns of a world consumed by the climate crisis. AKQA

Three hundred years ago in 1723, Antonio Vivaldi composed "The Four Seasons," a series of violin concertos inspired by the natural world. Now, scientists, composers and designers have reimagined the classic to help envision what the future might feel like in 2050 — a world forever changed by the climate crisis.

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Climate change protesters urge climate action and funding for the Green New Deal on September 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

While scientists and campaigners continue calling on world leaders to pursue more ambitious policies to cut planet-heating emissions based on moral arguments and physical dangers, a U.S. think tank released survey results on Tuesday that make a clear economic case for sweeping climate action.

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The plan involves selling leases off the coasts of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Patrik Del Mestre / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Climate action groups and ocean defenders issued strong praise Monday after the Biden administration announced its intention to boost the nation's offshore wind capacity with a number of steps including preparing forfede leases in an area off the coasts of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut.

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WWF activists light candles for Earth Hour in front of a darkened St. Basil's Cathedral on March, 27,2021, in Moscow, Russia. Mikhail Svetlov / Getty Images

Cities around the globe dimmed their lights for an hour on Saturday, to mark Earth Hour. The annual event organized by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) encourages countries to dim their lights for an hour starting at 8:30 p.m. local time.

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Feminist women from throughout the world take part in a Greenpeace organized march to call for the political and economic reforms needed to combat climate change while COP24 takes place in the city on December 8, 2018 in Katowice, Poland. Martyn Aim / Getty Images

By Nicole Greenfield

The climate crisis disproportionately impacts women—and women of color in particular. This is why women must lead on its solutions.

Last fall, two powerful hurricanes, Eta and Iota, slammed into Central America within two weeks of each other, causing massive flooding and landslides and affecting millions of people, primarily in Honduras and Nicaragua. Thousands were uprooted from their homes, and women, many with children in tow, suffered the greatest. The events followed a disturbing but familiar trend: The United Nations estimates that 80 percent of people displaced by climate change are women. And it's not just storms that affect them; researchers in India have found that droughts, too, hit women the hardest, rendering them more vulnerable than men to income loss, food insecurity, water scarcity, and related health complications.

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On Saturday, March 27, people around the world will celebrate the annual Earth Hour, albeit in a slightly different way.

This annual tradition, first launched by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and its partners in Sydney in 2007, involves participants from more than 180 countries switching off their lights on the last Saturday in March in order to call attention to the climate crisis and biodiversity loss. This year, the organizers are adding something extra: a virtual spotlight that can be shined on the Earth by sharing their video.

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Hawaiian food rescue group Aloha Harvest has helped to prevent food waste during the ongoing pandemic.

Last year, COVID-19 lockdowns forced many restaurants to close and events to be canceled at the last minute, so a lot of food that was already purchased stood to be wasted.

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