Quantcast

Even Your Sea Salt Contains Microplastics

Popular

Sea salt may be healthy and rich in minerals, but a new study found it is also rich in plastic.

Sea salt has gained some popularity in the past few years for mega health benefits like increased energy and immunity, and improved skin and dental health. But, a team of researchers tested 17 sea salt brands from eight different countries and found some shocking results.


Published in Scientific Reports, the team found that only one brand was plastic-free. The rest, which were soaked in water and dissolved, left behind a total of 72 particles. Of those 72 particles, 1 in 10 contained microplastics. Overall, 41.6 percent of those were plastic polymers and 23.6 percent were pigments from plastic materials. The most common plastic polymers were polypropylene and polyethylene, both of which are considered safe plastics by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

But, what's most concerning about microplastics is their prevalence in the ocean. Microplastics come from cosmetic products (think, exfoliating microbeads) or break down from larger plastics over time or through chemical processes. It is estimated that there are about 8 million tonnes of plastic entering the oceans every year. These particles enter the food chain because small organisms like plankton eat the plastic. Microplastics have been found in shrimp, salmon and even whales and seals.

The growing problem caused the United Nations to form a global initiative in February to encourage companies to reduce their use of microplastics. California is also taking the lead on banning microbeads and other states are following suit, like Connecticut, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington.

There are other solutions being touted to manage the crisis of plastics in our oceans, rivers and lakes. For example, 22-year-old Boyan Slat of The Ocean Cleanup will initiate large-scale trials of his cleanup technology in the Pacific Ocean later this year. Inventors at Bluebird Marine Systems have developed the SeaVax, a solar- and wind-powered ship that can suck up plastic waste. And, Mr. Trash Wheel and Professor Trash Wheel—a pair of floating, solar and hydro-powered trash interceptors—are busy every day keeping Baltimore's Inner Harbor free of plastic trash.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Mary Daly, president of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, poses for a photograph. Nick Otto / Washington Post / Getty Images

It seems the reality of the climate crisis is too much for the Federal Reserve to ignore anymore.

Read More Show Less

Passengers trying to reach Berlin's Tegel Airport on Sunday were hit with delays after police blocked roads and enacted tighter security controls in response to a climate protest.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A military police officer in Charlotte, North Carolina, pets Rosco, a post-traumatic stress disorder companion animal certified to accompany him, on Jan. 11, 2014. North Carolina National Guard

For 21 years, Doug Distaso served his country in the United States Air Force.

He commanded joint aviation, maintenance, and support personnel globally and served as a primary legislative affairs lead for two U.S. Special Operations Command leaders.

But after an Air Force plane accident left him with a traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain, Distaso was placed on more than a dozen prescription medications by doctors at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Read More Show Less
(L) Selma Three Stone Engagement Ring. (R) The Greener Diamond Farm Project. MiaDonna

By Bailey Hopp

If you had to choose a diamond for your engagement ring from below or above the ground, which would you pick … and why would you pick it? This is the main question consumers are facing when picking out their diamond engagement ring today. With a dramatic increase in demand for conflict-free lab-grown diamonds, the diamond industry is shifting right before our eyes.

Read More Show Less
Preliminary tests of the bubble barrier have shown it to be capable of ushering 80 percent of the canal's plastic waste to its banks. The Great Bubble Barrier / YouTube screenshot

The scourge of plastic waste that washes up on once-pristine beaches and finds its way into the middle of the ocean often starts on land, is dumped in rivers and canals, and gets carried out to sea. At the current rate, marine plastic is predicted to outweigh all the fish in the seas by 2050, according to Silicon Canals.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Man stands on stage at Fort Leonard Wood in the U.S. Brett Sayles / Pexels

Wilson "Woody" Powell served in the Air Force during the Korean war. But in the decades since, he's become staunchly anti-war.

Read More Show Less
Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at a rally in Council Bluffs, Iowa on Nov. 8. Matt Johnson / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

Joined by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Friday night, Sen. Bernie Sanders held the largest rally of any 2020 Democratic presidential candidate to date in Iowa, drawing more than 2,400 people to Iowa Western Community College in Council Bluffs.

Read More Show Less

Scientists have developed an innovative way to protect endangered rhinos from poaching: flood the market for rhino horn with a cheap, fake alternative.

Read More Show Less