Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Scientists Discover 'Most Diverse Coral Site' on Great Barrier Reef

Oceans
Scientists Discover 'Most Diverse Coral Site' on Great Barrier Reef
Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Steve Parish/ Lock the Gate Alliance / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Australian scientists have found the "most diverse coral site" on the Great Barrier Reef, observing at least 195 different species of corals in space no longer than 500 meters, The Guardian reported.

The non-profit organization Great Barrier Reef Legacy and marine scientist Charlie Veron, a world expert on coral reefs, confirmed the diversity of the site, also known as the "Legacy Super Site" on the outer reef.


"To give you an idea of the biodiversity of this special area, onboard expedition photographer ... Justin Gilligan just emerged from a dive stating he spent two hours in just a few square meters—there was just that much to see!" the Great Barrier Reef Legacy wrote in a Facebook post late last month.

Search for Solutions 2018: Video Log 9: Legacy Super Site www.youtube.com

Remarkably, Vernon described the site as "near as can be to an ideal physical environment" even though it is located in an area that was widely impacted by coral bleaching and coral mortality, according to The Guardian. The site has also been unaffected by cyclones or crown-of-thorns starfish that eat coral polyps.

However, Dean Miller, the Great Barrier Reef Legacy science and media director and leader of the expedition, warned that the site could be at risk due to high temperatures this summer, The Guardian reported.

The rise in global temperatures has had a major impact on the Great Barrier Reef. The remarkable but imperiled natural wonder is under risk of repeat coral bleaching events unless greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels are slashed.

"We must fight to better understand and safeguard places likes this—they are nature's treasure chests and will be responsible for reseeding coral reefs into the future," the Great Barrier Reef Legacy wrote in an Instagram post about the Legacy Super Site. Fittingly, the post ended with the hashtag "coral not coal."

The Australian government has received criticism from environmentalists over its investments in fossil fuel projects like the controversial Adani coal mine, which not only threaten the Great Barrier Reef, but also impinge on global efforts to reduce carbon.

Residents get in a car after leaving their homes to move to evacuation centers in central Vietnam's Quang Nam province on Oct. 27, 2020, ahead of Typhoon Molave's expected landfall. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP via Getty Images

Typhoon Molave is expected to make landfall in Vietnam on Wednesday with 90 mph winds and heavy rainfall that could lead to flooding and landslides, according to the U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate in Ho Chi Minh City. To prepare for the powerful storm that already tore through the Philippines, Vietnam is making plans to evacuate nearly 1.3 million people along the central coast, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Chipotle's "Real Foodprint" will tell you the ecological footprint of each menu item compared to the industry standard. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

How does your burrito impact the environment? If you ordered it from Chipotle, there is now a way to find out.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Are you noticing your shirts becoming too tight fitting to wear? Have you been regularly visiting a gym, yet it seems like your effort is not enough? It's okay to get disappointed, but not to lose hope.

Read More Show Less
Locals check out the new stretch of artificial beach in Manila Bay, Philippines on Sept, 19, 2020. patrickroque01 / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 4.0

By Sarah Steffen

A stretch of coastline in the Philippine capital, Manila has received backlash from environmentalists. The heavily polluted Manila Bay area, which had been slated for cleanup, has become the site of a controversial 500-meter (1,600-foot) stretch of white sand beach.

Read More Show Less
An illustration highlights the moon's Clavius Crater with an illustration depicting water trapped in the lunar soil there. NASA / Daniel Rutter

A pair of studies released Monday confirmed not only the presence of water and ice on the moon, but that it is more abundant than scientists previously thought. Those twin discoveries boost the prospect of a sustainable lunar base that could harvest the moon's resources to help sustain itself, according to the BBC.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch