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A Kirtland's warbler in the jack pines near Grayling, Michigan. Doug Greenberg / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

The Kirtland's warbler, a small songbird that nests only in the young jack pine forests of Michigan, Wisconsin and Ontario, was one of the very first animals placed on the U.S. list of endangered species. But now it has recovered enough to come off that list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced Tuesday.

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A PG&E analyst monitors weather and satellite images of fire areas at the PG&E Wildfire Safety Operations Center on Aug. 5 in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) began shutting off power in Northern California midnight Wednesday in its biggest attempt yet to prevent wildfires, The San Francisco Chronicle reported.

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The Paraguayan Chaco, South America's second largest forest, is rapidly disappearing as agriculture extends deeper into what was once forest. Here, isolated stands of trees remain amid the farms.

Joel E. Correia / CC BY-NC-ND

By Joel E. Correia

The fires raging across the Brazilian Amazon have captured the world's attention. Meanwhile, South America's second-largest forest, the Gran Chaco, is disappearing in plain sight.

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A jaguar in the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil in 2006. Land Rover Our Planet / Flickr

By Shreya Dasgupta

The fires ravaging the Amazon forest in Brazil and Bolivia this year have burned key habitats of at least 500 adult, resident jaguars as of Sept. 17, rendering them dead or homeless, say experts at Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization.

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Forest fire continues to blaze in Indonesesia on Sept. 18. WAHYUDI / AFP / Getty Images

Nearly 200 people have been arrested in Indonesia over their possible connections to the massive wildfires raging in the nation's forest, officials said this week.

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Brazilians living in The Netherlands organized a demonstration in solidarity with rainforest protectors and against the president of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro on Sept. 1 in The Hague, Netherlands. Romy Arroyo Fernandez / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Tara Smith

Fires in the Brazilian Amazon have jumped 84 percent during President Jair Bolsonaro's first year in office and in July 2019 alone, an area of rainforest the size of Manhattan was lost every day. The Amazon fires may seem beyond human control, but they're not beyond human culpability.

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Natural Disaster Minister David Littleproud at Parliament House on Sept. 11 in Canberra, Australia. Tracey Nearmy / Getty Images

While more than 130 wildfires are raging across two states in eastern Australia — Queensland and New South Wales — at an unusually early part of the spring, taxing the water supplies of the drought-stricken country, the country's federal appointee for handling disasters expressed doubts that humans are causing the climate crisis. Then, the next day he made a head scratching about face and said he believes in climate science and always has, according to the Guardian.

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Handout picture released by the Colombian presidency showing Colombian President Ivan Duque (2-L) speaking next to Bolivian President Evo Morales (L) and in front of Brazilian Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo (2-R) and Ecuadorean President Lenin Moreno (R), during a meeting with Indigenous leaders before the Presidential Summit for the Amazon at the National University in Leticia, department of Amazonas, Colombia, on Sept. 6. NICOLAS GALEANO / AFP / Getty Images

Seven Amazon countries signed a pact Friday to protect the world's largest tropical rainforest in response to the record-breaking number of wildfires that have blazed through the Amazon rainforest this summer, Reuters reported.

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A helicopter drops water on a smoldering area of the Tenaja wildfire burning Sept. 5 in the hills above Murrieta, California. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

A fast moving wildfire burned through 753 football fields worth of Southern California in just five hours Wednesday, CNN reported.

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Aerial image of burning in the Serra do Cachimbo REBIO (Biological Reserve) in Altamira, state of Pará.

By Rhett Butler

Brazil's National Space Research Institute (INPE) resumed releasing deforestation data after nearly a month-long hiatus that followed the firing of the agency's director on Aug. 2.

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Using fire like this farmer to clear land in the Amazon will be banned in Brazil for 60 days. Stephanie Maze / Corbis Documentary / Getty Images Plus

Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro signed a decree Wednesday banning the use of fire to clear land in the Amazon rainforest for 60 days, CNN reported.

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