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The exact location of the prehistoric trees saved by firefighters has been kept a secret to protect them from contamination. NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment / CC BY 4.0

It looks as if firefighters in Australia have succeeded in saving a secret grove of prehistoric trees belonging to a species that dates back to the time of the dinosaurs.

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A pillar measures the water level in a lake during a drought in Surin, Thailand. Sutthiwat Srikhrueadam / Moment / Getty Images

By Brett Walton

The world's business elite, apprehensive about turbulent geopolitics after a year of international turmoil, nonetheless sees the biggest risks to society in the next decade coming from changes outside boardrooms and parliaments.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A kangaroo jumps in a field amidst smoke from a bushfire in Snowy Valley on the outskirts of Cooma on Jan. 4. SAEED KHAN / AFP / Getty Images

The last decade was the hottest since record-keeping began 150 years ago, according to the latest data from U.S. agencies the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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James Murdoch, founder and CEO of Lupa Systems and editor in chief at Vanity Fair Radhika Jones speak at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 23, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. Matt Winkelmeyer / Getty Images for Vanity Fair

James Murdoch and his wife Kathryn spoke out against the climate crisis denials pushed by his father's media empire in an exclusive statement released to the Daily Beast.

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Rural FIre Service firefighters conduct property protection patrols at the Dunn Road fire on Jan. 10, 2020 in Mount Adrah, Australia as about 135 fires burned in NSW, 50 of which were uncontained. Sam Mooy / Getty Images

By Andy Rowell

After weeks of inaction and ineptitude as his country burns, as a billion animals die, with entire species potentially wiped out, and with dozens of people dead and communities and lives ripped apart, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has finally slumbered into action.

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A rally organized by Extinction Rebellion and Parents for Future in front of the Australian Embassy on Jan. 10, 2020. The Australian government plans the huge coal mine project Adani, despite devastating bushfires and rising emissions worldwide. Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

Siemens has announced it will remain involved in a controversial coal mining project in Australia, despite massive environmental criticism as the country continues to be ravaged by bushfires.

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A wallaby licks its burnt paws after escaping a bushfire on the Liberation Trail near the township of Nana Glen on the Mid North Coast of NSW, Nov. 12, 2019. Wolter Peeters / The Sydney Morning Herald / Fairfax Media / Getty Images

Carrots to the rescue!

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A plume of bushfire smoke rises above Mount Taylor Road bordering local farm land on Jan. 11 in Karatta, Australia. Lisa Maree Williams / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

At first glance, the images seem more like nightmares than real life. Blood-red skies that appear to have seeped into the earth below, staining it hellishly. Cyclone-like whirls with columns of flame at their centers. People and animals huddled close together on a beach, ready to jump into the ocean should the encroaching fires reach their makeshift camp and leave them with no choice.

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The Kangaroo Island Fire in Australia early January 2020. A targeted, coordinated online campaign has tried to mislead the public. While the myths have been debunked, the culpable parties remain unknown. robdownunder / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Timothy Graham, Tobias R. Keller

In the first week of 2020, hashtag #ArsonEmergency became the focal point of a new online narrative surrounding the bushfire crisis.

The message: the cause is arson, not climate change.

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A helicopter passes smoke from a wildfire on July 3, 2019 south of Talkeetna, Alaska. Alaska experienced its record-high temperatures in 2019. Lance King / Getty Images

Last year's brutal heat waves that swept through Europe, caused wildfires in Alaska and Siberia, and have left Australia as a tinderbox registered as the second hottest year ever — 0.1 degrees Fahrenheit or 0.04 degrees Celsius cooler than 2016, according to scientists at the Copernicus Climate Change Service, an intergovernmental agency supported by the European Union, as The New York Times reported.

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Tourists watch and photograph the floodlit popular destination Three Sisters during a bushfire on an unknown date in Jamison Valley, Blue Mountains National Park, Australia. Andrew Merry / Moment / Getty Images

By Michael Mann

After years studying the climate, my work has brought me to Sydney where I'm studying the linkages between climate change and extreme weather events.

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