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The pumice raft as seen from space on Aug. 13. NASA Earth Observatory

Could an undersea volcanic eruption help the Great Barrier Reef recover from coral bleaching?

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XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY / THE OCEAN AGENCY

Hope may be on the horizon for the world's depleted coral reefs thanks to scientists who successfully reproduced endangered corals in a laboratory setting for the first time, according to Reuters.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. The Ocean Agency / Xl Catlin Seaview Survey

Marine heat waves are increasing in frequency, duration and intensity, which spell trouble for corals, according to new research from scientists working at the Great Barrier Reef.

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mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

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Lesions (white) eat into the tissue of maze corals on Flat Cay reef, near St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The lesions are caused by a new and deadly disease that's spreading through the Caribbean. Marilyn Brandt

Marine biologists are dealing with a mystery. What's killing the coral reefs in the Caribbean?

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Tropical fish and turtle swim in the Red Sea, Egypt, an inlet of the Indian Ocean. vlad61 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Saturday, June 8 is World Oceans Day, a chance to honor and celebrate our blue planet. Ocean lovers around the world will attend beach cleanings and other events or join a March for the Ocean to call for an end to activities that harm marine life, like offshore oil drilling and plastic pollution.

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Bottlenose dolphins playing in the Pacific Ocean near New Zealand. georgeclerk / E+ / Getty Images

By Sarah Chasis

June 8 is World Oceans Day, dedicated to celebrating our beautiful, mysterious, and life-giving oceans.

As our oceans make up more than 70 percent of the earth's surface, their health drives the future of our planet. Oceans give us every other breath we take, provide a critical source of protein and a way of life for billions of people, contribute trillions of dollars to the world economy, and are home to 50 percent to 80 percent of this planet's life.

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Divers search the coral reefs of the Society Islands in French Polynesia on May 9, where major bleaching is occurring and scientists are studying the resilience of coral. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

A changing climate is altering oceans in major ways and coral reefs around the planet may not be able to adapt to survive.

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© picture-alliance

A group of indigenous Australians plans to submit a complaint to the UN that accuses Australia of failing to act on climate change.

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Underwater view of waves breaking over a healthy coral reef, reducing wave energy at the shoreline that can cause flooding. Curt Storlazzi, USGS

By Michael Beck

The news is grim: According to a report compiled by hundreds of scientists from 50 countries, Earth is losing species faster than at any other time in human history. Thanks to climate change, coastal development and the impacts of activities such as logging, farming and fishing, roughly 1 million plants and animals are facing extinction.

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Darryl Leniuk / Getty Images

By Katie Day

An emerging concern among ocean scientists, stewards and beachgoers is the impact that certain chemical sunscreens are having on the marine environment. This has led to bans on the sale and use of chemical sunscreens in states and island communities such as Hawaii, Key West and Aruba, and a proposed federal ban in all U.S. National Marine Sanctuaries containing coral reefs. There has also been a surge in the production of "reef friendly" sunscreens — but what does that actually mean, and how safe are these alternative sunscreens to the marine environment?

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