Quantcast

Documentary Spotlight: Yemeniettes

Business

One of my favorite events of the year is almost here—the Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) from March 19 to March 30 at Tower City Cinemas.

There are eight eco-films this year, in CIFF’s It’s Easy Being Green sidebar sponsored by Great Lakes Brewing Company, bringing awareness and support to the environmental movement working to save our planet.

I’ll feature one film per day. Today, Yemeniettes. Yesterday, A Will for the Woods, Last week, SlingshotThe Horses of FukushimaFarmland and Antarctica: A Year on Ice.

CIFF’s Eddie Fleisher provided this synopsis of the film:

Yemeniettes tells the incredibly inspiring story of a group of teenage girls from Yemen who start their own business. After years of gender inequality and poor education, a new generation of Yemeni females is beginning to empower themselves. Thanks to teachers and parents who encourage this change, the girls in the film enter their company, Creative Generation, into an entrepreneurship competition. There they showcase a series of solar products they’ve developed, aimed to improve the lives of their people. As they speak about technology and innovation, it's easy to forget they're kids. Their passion, excitement and positivity are extremely contagious. This uplifting documentary follows them as they move through the rounds, inching towards a slot at the pan-Arab championships in Doha, Qatar. If they win, Creative Generation would receive funding, turning their idea into a fully legitimate operation. Furthermore, it would give hope to other girls in the region, contributing to a new culture of equality. There's no doubt about it—you'll be rooting for these amazing girls all the way to the end. Note: Recommended for pre-teens and older. (In Arabic with subtitles)

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A man wearing a protective mask sits on the lawn in front of the Australian Parliament house in Canberra, Australia on Jan. 1, 2020. The level of air pollution in Canberra is the highest in the world on some days. Daniiielc / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Researchers now say there is "no safe level" of air pollution exposure after a large-scale study found a correlation between exposure to fine particle matter, known as PM2.5, and cardiac arrests, according to the The Sydney Morning Herald.

Read More
The British Medical Journal announced a fossil fuel divestment campaign. Andrew Matthews / PA Images via Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Respected medical journal The BMJ drew praise online from climate activists and medical professionals for its newly-announced fossil fuel divestment campaign.

Read More
Sponsored
A roller coaster on the Jersey Shore flooded after Hurricane Sandy. Photo credit: Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.jpg: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen / U.S. Air Force / New Jersey National Guard / CC BY 2.0

New Jersey will be the first state in the U.S. to require builders to take the climate crisis into consideration before seeking permission for a project.

Read More
Workers selectively harvest slightly under-ripe Syrah grapes to make a Blanc de Noir wine for the Israeli winery Zaza on Aug. 6, 2019 in central Israel. Israeli vintners are harvesting their grapes earlier than they did a decade ago due to shorter winters and more intense summers. David Silverman / Getty Images

The climate crisis may be coming for your favorite wines.

Read More
An aerial view of a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp Fire on Nov. 15, 2018 in Paradise, Calif. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Respecting scientists has never been a priority for the Trump Administration. Now, a new investigation from The Guardian revealed that Department of the Interior political appointees sought to play up carbon emissions from California's wildfires while hiding emissions from fossil fuels as a way to encourage more logging in the national forests controlled by the Interior department.

Read More