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Celebrate World Oceans Day From Home With the UN This Monday

Oceans
Celebrate World Oceans Day From Home With the UN This Monday
UN World Oceans Day is usually an invite-only affair at the UN headquarters in New York, but this year anyone can join in by following the live stream on the UNWOD website from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. https://unworldoceansday.org/

Monday is World Oceans Day, but how can you celebrate our blue planet while social distancing?


Luckily, the UN has you covered with a fascinating lineup of talks focusing on the theme of "innovation for a sustainable ocean." UN World Oceans Day (UNWOD) is usually an invite-only affair at the UN headquarters in New York, but this year anyone can join in by following the live stream on the UNWOD website from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time.

The event is a partnership with solutions-focused non-profit Oceanic Global.

"It's an honor to partner with the United Nations on World Oceans Day 2020," the group's founder and executive director Lea d'Auriol said in a statement. "As an organization, Oceanic Global focuses on industry and individual solutions that engage new audiences in ocean conservation. This year's World Oceans Day theme, 'Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean' ties perfectly into our mission as we are always seeking new paths forward to further support ocean health as well as amplify the voices within the ocean community."

Here is a selection of some of the voices you will get a chance to hear by tuning in:

1. Cara Delevingne: Delevingne is an actress and musician who also launched EcoResolution to encourage people to take action on the climate crisis. She will deliver the opening remarks, focusing on how we are connected to the ocean and the importance of protecting it.

When: 10 a.m.

2. Francis Zoet: Zoet developed the Great Bubble Barrier to stop some of the eight billion kilos of plastic that enter the oceans every year. Zoet's barrier stops plastic from entering the ocean from rivers or canals while allowing fish and ships to pass through. She will explain the barrier and how it could be scaled up on a panel with other innovators called "Spotlight Solutions" for the Ocean.

When: 11 a.m.

3. Jean-Michel, Céline and Fabien Cousteau: The family of explorers and conservationists will speak on how their family has used technology to increase our understanding of the ocean over time and therefore of what needs protecting and how.

When: 12 p.m.

4. Lilly Platt: Platt has cleaned up more than 100 thousand pieces of plastic since launching Lilly's Plastic Pickup in 2015, when she was just seven years old. She will speak on her experience of youth environmental activism along with other young ocean advocates on a panel called Youth Driving Innovation for a Sustainable Ocean.

When: 3 p.m.

5. A Concert for the Ocean: The day will wrap up with live performances from musicians around the world, including Fatoumata Diawara, Vieux Farka Touré and Alice Phoebe Lou.

When: 4 p.m.

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