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By James Clasper

A dozen children are sitting in a circle when the bell rings. Instead of rushing to their next class, the children close their eyes.

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Margot Chirayath holds open the lid to a recycling container as Interns peer inside during a walk in South Portland Thursday, June 13, 2019. Shawn Patrick Ouellette / Portland Portland Press Herald / Getty Images

Just because that plastic item you rinsed out and placed in your blue bin says it is recyclable doesn't mean it actually is.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Petros Kusmu, George Patrick Richard Benson

  • We can all take steps to reduce the environmental impact of our work-related travels.
  • Individual actions — like the six described here — can cumulatively help prompt more collective changes, but it helps to prioritize by impact.
  • As the saying goes: be the change you want to see in the world.
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SolStock / Moment / Getty Images

By Tyler Wells Lynch

For years, Toni Genberg assumed a healthy garden was a healthy habitat. That's how she approached the landscaping around her home in northern Virginia. On trips to the local gardening center, she would privilege aesthetics, buying whatever looked pretty, "which was typically ornamental or invasive plants," she said. Then, in 2014, Genberg attended a talk by Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware. "I learned I was actually starving our wildlife," she said.

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Large pile of discarded fruit and vegetables, some floating in water. James Arnold / Moment / Getty Images

Consumers may waste more than twice as much food as previously thought, a new study has found.

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Tests on an MIT building rooftop showed that a simple proof-of-concept desalination device could produce clean, drinkable water at a rate equivalent to more than 1.5 gallons per hour for each square meter of solar collecting area. Images courtesy of the researchers

By Paul Brown

An international team of scientists has developed a cheap way to provide fresh water to thirsty communities by making seawater drinkable without using electricity.

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Los Angeles City Hall, Clara Shortridge Foltz Criminal Justice Center and Spring Street Courthouse - Los Angeles Superior Court, on Oct. 5, 2018. Russell Mondy / Flickr

By Maria Stamas

Los Angeles Mayor Garcetti on Monday committed all new or substantially rehabilitated buildings owned by the City of Los Angeles to be 100 percent carbon free — and to use less carbon-intensive building materials in the process. His executive directive not only has Los Angeles leading by example on ways to reduce building emissions, it breaks new ground.

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By Diana Madson

On 87 acres of land owned by the city of Fayetteville, Arkansas, solar panels absorb the sun's rays.

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Joaquin Phoenix, winner of the Actor in a Leading Role award for "Joker," poses in the press room during the 92nd Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood and Highland on Feb. 9 in Hollywood, California. Rachel Luna / Getty Images

From sustainable fashion to vegan appetizers, green was the new gold at the 92nd Academy Awards Sunday.

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People taking a break in German park landscape on top of modern office complex (composite image). EschCollection / Stone / Getty Images
  • Despite efforts to achieve net-zero by 2050, global emissions are still rising.
  • A new study suggests ways to fast-track efforts to decarbonize the planet.
  • Building a business case for sustainable energy could drive the transition.

It's not too late to stop climate change. According to new research, decarbonizing fast enough to stabilize the climate and fast-track the planet to net-zero rests on all of us changing how we think and act — and doing it fast.

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A women fills a water bottle with a filter from an alpine lake in the mountains around Pemberton, British Columbia, Canada. Canada is on the front lines of rapid climate changes that affect the water cycle. Ben Girardi / Aurora Photos / Getty Images

By Corinne Schuster-Wallace, Robert Sandford and Stephanie Merrill

In recent years, the daily news has been flooded with stories of water woes from coast to coast to coast.

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