Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Climate Scientists Explore Melting Alaskan Glaciers on ‘Earth Focus'

Climate

Climate science is a hot topic these days, everywhere from TV studios to Congressional floors, with people using it as evidence to back up claims regarding what the planet may or may not be doing.

However, it's not often that we actually get to see it in action. Earth Focus changes all of that by following scientists and students to Alaska's Juneau Icefield, near the Canadian border, to study glaciers and their impact on the environment. It is the fifth-largest expanse of ice covering the planet.

Ninety-five percent of Alaskan glaciers are melting at an "unnatural and unprecedented pace," said Jeff Barbee, who more than two decades ago took part in the Juneau Icefield Research Program he is reporting on in this episode of Earth Focus.

"Glaciers are really large contributors to changing sea levels," added Anthony Arendt, an assistant research professor at the University of Alaska who designed satellite imagery systems for NASA.

"We want to be able to quantify how much water if coming out of these systems every year and then use that information to develop models and predict into the future to help policymakers plan for potential effects of seal-level change in the next 50 or 100 years."

The episode also features interviews with Julienne Stroeve of the National Snow and Ice Data Center and Dr. Michael E. Mann, director of Penn State University’s Earth System Science Center.

Among other things, Mann discusses why he believes some IPCC reports to be on the conservative side, while Stroeve talks about how the patterns of droughts, floods and precipitation might change over time.

EARTH FOCUS airs every Thursday at 9 p.m. ET (6 p.m. PT) on Link TV—channel 375 on DIRECTV and channel 9410 on DISH Network. Episodes are also available to watch online at linktv.org/earthfocus.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less