Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

California Wildfires Burn 10,000 Acres in a Single Day

Climate
California Wildfires Burn 10,000 Acres in a Single Day
Smoke from the Glass Fire rises from the hills on September 27, 2020 in Calistoga, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Just days after a new report detailed the "unequivocal and pervasive role" climate change plays in the increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, new fires burned 10,000 acres on Sunday as a "dome" of hot, dry air over Northern California created ideal fire conditions over the weekend.


In Napa County, the Glass Fire burned more than 2,500 acres, forcing at least 2,000 residents and a hospital to evacuate and threatening about 2,200 structures.

The fire tore through vineyards and jumped two rivers Sunday evening and was zero percent contained as of late Sunday night.

"It's a cremation," Craig Battuello, whose family has raised grapes in St. Helena for more than a century, told KPIX.

As of Monday morning, the Shady and Boysen Fires, burning near the Sonoma-Napa county line were believed to be spot fires from the Glass Fire.

Further north, the Zogg Fire had burned 7,000 acres as of Sunday evening.

Electricity will be shut off for 65,000 Northern California customers in 16 counties to prevent the spread of the fires.

For a deeper dive:

Increased frequency and intensity: BBC, E&E; Weekend conditions: Washington Post, The Guardian, San Francisco Chronicle; Fires: CNN, KPIX, San Francisco Gate, CBS, The Press Democrat, San Francisco Chronicle, ABC-7 KGO News, Mercury News, KRCR, SFist, San Francisco Chronicle, Weather Channel; Climate signals background: Wildfires, 2020 Western wildfire season

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C. struck down the Trump administration's proposed changes to the SNAP benefits program. Robert Nickelsberg / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A federal judge in Washington, D.C. late Sunday struck down the Trump administration's proposed changes to the SNAP benefits program, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of people from losing badly needed federal food assistance.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Demonstrators hold signs at an anti-tar sands march in St. Paul, Minnesota in 2015. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Andrea Germanos

A group of Indigenous women and their allies on Monday urged the heads of major global financial institutions to stop propping up the tar sands industry and sever all ties with the sector's "climate-wrecking pipelines, as well as the massively destructive extraction projects that feed them."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Poor eating habits, lack of exercise, genetics, and a bunch of other things are known to be behind excessive weight gain. But, did you know that how much sleep you get each night can also determine how much weight you gain or lose?

Read More Show Less
A flying squirrel in Florida. Despite their name, flying squirrels do not actually fly, but rather glide between trees. Danita Delimont / Gallo Images / Getty Images Plus

In January of 2019, a concerned citizen in Marion County, Florida noticed something strange: Someone was trapping flying squirrels.

Read More Show Less
New research finds baby bottles may release millions of microplastic particles with each feeding. Beeki / Needpix

The process of preparing and mixing a baby bottle formula seems innocuous, but new research finds this common occurrence is actually releasing millions of microplastic particles from the bottle's lining, Wired reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch