Quantcast

11 Arrested at Monsanto Protest Outside Shareholder Meeting

Food

Dozens of protestors from around the globe rallied against Monsanto, the world's largest seed company, on Tuesday urging its shareholders to consider the risks of growing and consuming genetically modified crops.

Protestors, with signs in hand, converged at the Monsanto headquarters in suburban St. Louis, MO during the company's annual investors meeting in support of two shareholder resolutions that questioned the level of contamination passed onto non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) crops and requested the seed giant end its fight against mandatory labels on foods containing GMO ingredients, reports Reuters.

The resolutions failed by considerable margins and 11 protestors were arrested after attempting to disrupt traffic near the Monsanto gates.

“Right now there’s a growing movement to label genetically modified food,” said Dave Murphy, executive director of Food Democracy Now!, who presented the labeling proposal at Tuesday's shareholder meeting “Monsanto has chosen unfortunately to resist the rights of American people.”

Over the last two years, Monsanto has spent more than $13.4 million to defeat GMO labeling efforts in California and Washington state, said Murphy.

Shareholder Adam Eidinger introduced the labeling resolution, hoping to get at least 7 percent of investors to support it, but wound up with just 4 percent, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

The second resolution, introduced by shareholder John Harrington, focused on Monsanto’s potential liability to organic farmers. It received just 6.5 percent support from investors.

Live audio of the shareholder meeting, which was broadcast for the first time on the internet, also attracted Monsanto supporters, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Justin Danhof, general counsel for the National Center for Public Policy Research, told WSJ.com the protest was a “campaign of junk science” against biotech foods. Danhof insisted Monsanto combat the environmentalist outcry by enlisting its scientists as spokespeople on talk radio and other media to create an open conversation with the public.

According to Reuters, the protest resolutions were backed by environmental, food safety and consumer activist groups. Protestors said that 2.6 million members of those groups support the anti-GMO initiative.

"It's time that Monsanto join the 21st century and allow Americans the basic right to know what's in their food, something that's already done in 64 other countries around the world. Why not America?" said Murphy.

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD and GMO pages for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixnio

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many types of flour are commonly available on the shelves of your local supermarket.

Read More Show Less
A visitor views a digital representation of the human genome at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Mario Tama / Getty Images

Genetics are significantly more responsible for driving autism spectrum disorders than maternal factors or environmental factors such as vaccines and chemicals, according to a massive new study involving more than 2 million people from five different countries.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Emilie Karrick Surrusco

Across the globe, extreme weather is becoming the new normal.

Read More Show Less
A worker in California sprays pesticides on strawberries, one of the crops on which chlorpyrifos is used. Paul Grebliunas / The Image Bank / Getty Images Plus

President Donald Trump's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will not ban the agricultural use of chlorpyrifos, a toxic pesticide that the EPA's own scientists have linked to brain damage in children, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Conservationists estimate the orange-fronted parakeet population has likely doubled. Department of Conservation

Up until 25 years ago, New Zealand's orange-fronted parakeet, or kākāriki karaka, was believed to be extinct. Now, it's having one of its best breeding seasons in decades, NPR reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

The world's population will hit 10 billion in just 30 years and all of those people need to eat. To feed that many humans with the resources Earth has, we will have to cut down the amount of beef we eat, according to a new report by the World Resources Institute.

Read More Show Less

Beachgoers enjoying a pleasant evening on Georgia's St. Simons Island rushed into the water, despite warnings of sharks, to rescue dozens of short-finned pilot whales that washed ashore on Tuesday evening, according to the New York Times.

Read More Show Less