chemicals
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

chemicals

A wild manatee swims through algae floating in the water near Tampa, Florida. milehightraveler / Getty Images

By Larry Brand

Millions of gallons of water laced with fertilizer ingredients are being pumped into Florida's Tampa Bay from a leaking reservoir at an abandoned phosphate plant at Piney Point. As the water spreads into the bay, it carries phosphorus and nitrogen – nutrients that under the right conditions can fuel dangerous algae blooms that can suffocate sea grass beds and kill fish, dolphins and manatees.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An explosion at an Ohio paint factory injured eight people, two of them critically.

Read More Show Less
boonchai wedmakawand / Moment / Getty Images

Delta-8 THC is a cannabis product that has become a bestseller over the past few months, as many consumers find they can legally purchase it from CBD retailers. Its proponents say that Delta-8 THC will give you a nice little buzz, minus some of the more intense feelings (including paranoia) that are sometimes associated with marijuana.

Delta-8 THC is being marketed as a legal option for consumers who either don't live in a state with legal cannabis, or are a little apprehensive about how traditional psychoactive THC products will affect them. But is it all it's cracked up to be? Let's take a closer look, exploring what Delta-8 THC is, how it differs from other THC products, and whether it's actually legal for use.

Read More Show Less
A helicopter sprays pesticide on a crop field in California. Jeff Foott / Photodisc / Getty Images

A new study adds to the evidence that pesticides harm children's health.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Flooding and a coal ash spill at Duke Energy's Sutton power plant near Wilmington, North Carolina on Sept. 21, 2018 after Hurricane Florence. Jo-Anne McArthur / Waterkeeper Alliance Inc. / Flickr

The threat of a catastrophic failure unleashing a 20-foot wall of industrial wastewater over nearby homes and businesses in Piney Point, Florida, illustrates the danger of widespread reliance on industrial waste ponds across the U.S., The New York Times reports.

Read More Show Less
Young unaccompanied migrants, ages 3-9, watch TV inside a playpen at the Department of Homeland Security holding facility on March 30, 2021 in Donna, Texas. Dario Lopez-Mills - Pool / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

In a move that was condemned by environmental justice advocates on Friday, President Joe Biden's administration earlier this week sent 500 unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors to Fort Bliss — a highly contaminated and potentially hazardous military base in El Paso, Texas — and is reportedly considering using additional toxic military sites as detention centers for migrant children in U.S. custody.

Read More Show Less
A farm worker sprays pesticides on lemon groves in Spain. Worledit / iStock / Getty Images Plus

About one third of the world's agricultural land is at high risk from pesticide pollution, a new study has found.

Read More Show Less
Independent pharmacy and lab Valisure has found high concentrations of benzene in 22 hand sanitizers. Morsa Images / Getty Images

As people rushed to buy hand sanitizer during the first months of the pandemic, new brands emerged to fill the gap left by more well-known labels. But in the frenzy, some manufacturers appear to have cut corners.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Hudson Mohawk Environmental Action Network / YouTube

By Kenny Stancil

New research conducted by environmental justice scholars at Vermont's Bennington College reveals that between 2016 and 2020, the U.S. military oversaw the "clandestine burning" of more than 20 million pounds of Aqueous Fire Fighting Foam in low-income communities around the country — even though there is no evidence that incineration destroys the toxic "forever chemicals" that make up the foam and are linked to a range of cancers, developmental disorders, immune dysfunction, and infertility.

Read More Show Less
A sign in a San Francisco Starbucks coffee shop warns customers that coffee and baked goods sold at the shop and elsewhere contain acrylamide, a chemical known to cause cancer and reproductive toxicity. The proposition is a California law passed by voters in 1986. Robert Alexander / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A public health watchdog on Wednesday praised California's proposal to add the so-called "forever chemical" PFOA to the state's list of chemicals known to cause cancer.

PFOA, or perfluorooctanoic acid, was formerly used to make DuPont's Teflon and other products. It's part of a group of chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Dubbed forever chemicals because they don't break down and can accumulate in the human body, PFAS contamination is widespread. Humans can be exposed through workplace environments, groundwater contamination, or household products.

Read More Show Less
Trending
De Beers Namaqualand Mine, Kleinzee. Matthew Gavin Frank

By Matthew Gavin Frank

In early 2021, De Beers — the world's biggest diamond company — achieved something of a public relations coup when it announced two new prestige jewelry lines intended to position the notoriously polluting corporation as environmentally friendly and responsible.

Read More Show Less
A dispenser with "Reef friendly" sunscreen can be seen on the wall at the surfjack Hotel in Honolulu. Christina Horsten / Picture Alliance / Getty Images

Hawaii is on its way to banning more reef-damaging sunscreens.

Read More Show Less
Dumped fridges at the water's edge release CFCs into the atmosphere. Eye Ubiquitous / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

The Montreal Protocol banning ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in 1987 has been hailed as an example of successful international collaboration to stop an environmental threat. But, like a creature from a horror movie, those banned chemicals could rise from the depths to stalk our atmosphere once again.

Read More Show Less