Quantcast

World's Largest Vertical Garden Boasts 33,500 Square Feet of Plants

Popular
The Santalaia in Bogotá, Colombia

The largest vertical garden in the world looks like a living, breathing green giant in Bogotá, Colombia's densely populated capital.


The Santalaia building, erected by biologist and botanist Ignacio Solano with vertical garden and green roof firm Groncol, gives much-needed greenery to the sprawling city.

Located in the Rosales barrio, the multi-family residential building features of 3,117 square meters (33,551 square feet) of plants. The building is nine stories above ground and two stories underground and was completed in December 2015 after 16 months of planning and construction.

About 115,000 plants of 10 different species were incorporated in the project, which Groncol says helps reduce urban heat island effect and produces oxygen for 3,000 people yearly .

"The architect's intent was to produce a uniform green layer with real plants," said Pablo Atuesta, general manager of Groncol. "He would have preferred to have only one species, but since it was too risky, we built several prototypes with different plants that would give us a uniform green tone and plant volume.

"The building should enhance the comfort and well being of its inhabitants, and the designer wanted the sensation of being surrounded by plants so as not to feel as though you were living in a dense urban environment like the one we have in Bogotá," Atuesta added.

The lucky family living in one of the penthouses even has a private rooftop garden and playground.

A specially designed hydroponic irrigation system hydrates the massive vertical garden that consists of plants such as dwarf Hebe, asparagus fern, rosemary, vincas and spathiphyllum flowering plants, among others.

"Designing irrigation, water recycling systems, as well as plant selection were some of the biggest challenges with the Santalaia project. The Santalaia building is also using water from the apartments' showers for irrigation," Atuesta said. "Among many technical details, we installed humidity and radiation sensors to optimize water consumption as well as a water treatment plant so as not to have any water waste."

Take a tour of the lush green building:

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Ketura Persellin

Global consumption of beef, lamb and goat is expected to rise by almost 90 percent between 2010 and 2050. But that doesn't mean you need to eat more meat. In fact, recent news from Washington gives you even less confidence in your meat: Pork inspections may be taken over by the industry itself, if a Trump administration proposal goes into effect, putting tests for deadly pathogens into the hands of line workers.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kaitlyn Berkheiser

While enjoying an occasional alcoholic beverage is unlikely to harm your health, drinking in excess can have substantial negative effects on your body and well-being.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
MStudioImages / E+ / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Backpacking is an exciting way to explore the wilderness or travel to foreign countries on a budget.

Read More Show Less
Tim P. Whitby / 21st Century Fox / Getty Images

The beauty products we put on our skin can have important consequences for our health. Just this March, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that some Claire's cosmetics had tested positive for asbestos. But the FDA could only issue a warning, not a recall, because current law does not empower the agency to do so.

Michelle Pfeiffer wants to change that.

The actress and Environmental Working Group (EWG) board member was spotted on Capitol Hill Thursday lobbying lawmakers on behalf of a bill that would increase oversight of the cosmetics industry, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
A protest march against the Line 3 pipeline in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 18, 2018. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Collin Rees

We know that people power can stop dangerous fossil fuel projects like the proposed Line 3 tar sands oil pipeline in Minnesota, because we've proved it over and over again — and recently we've had two more big wins.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Scientists released a study showing that a million species are at risk for extinction, but it was largely ignored by the corporate news media. Danny Perez Photography / Flickr / CC

By Julia Conley

Scientists at the United Nations' intergovernmental body focusing on biodiversity sounded alarms earlier this month with its report on the looming potential extinction of one million species — but few heard their calls, according to a German newspaper report.

Read More Show Less
DoneGood

By Cullen Schwarz

Ethical shopping is a somewhat new phenomenon. We're far more familiar with the "tried and tested" methods of doing good, like donating our money or time.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

Summer is fast approaching, which means it's time to stock up on sunscreen to ward off the harmful effects of sun exposure. Not all sunscreens are created equally, however.

Read More Show Less