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Tyson Foods Recalls Nearly 70,000 Pounds of Chicken Strips After Customers Find ‘Fragments of Metal’

Food
Tyson Foods Recalls Nearly 70,000 Pounds of Chicken Strips After Customers Find ‘Fragments of Metal’
Krystal B / Flickr

Tyson Foods is recalling approximately 69,093 pounds of frozen chicken strips because they may have been contaminated with pieces of metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Thursday.

The affected products were fully-cooked "Buffalo Style" and "Crispy" chicken strips with a "use by" date of Nov. 30, 2019 and an establishment number of "P-7221" on the back of the package.

"FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers' freezers," the recall notice said. "Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase."


The problem was discovered after two customers complained that they had found "fragments of metal" in the chicken strips, Tyson Foods reported in its recall announcement.

"Even though these reports involved only two packages, out of an abundance of caution, the company is recalling these products," the company said. "Tyson Foods has received no reports of injuries or illnesses associated with the affected product."

The recall comes less than two months after Tyson recalled more than 36,000 pounds of chicken nuggets after customers found "soft, blue rubber" inside. Tyson said the rubber had come from a piece of equipment that got pinched and ended up in the nugget mixture. It said it would take steps to make sure a similar incident did not happen again.

The most recent recall impacts food produced in one plant on Nov. 30, 2018, Tyson said. The recalled products were then shipped to distribution centers in Arkansas, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin.

The full details of the impacted products are as follows, according to FSIS:

  • 25-oz. plastic bag packages of frozen "Tyson FULLY COOKED BUFFALO STYLE CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT AND BUFFALO STYLE SAUCE" with "BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019," case codes 3348CNQ0317 and 3348CNQ0318, and individual bag time stamps from 17:00 through 18:59 hours (inclusive).
  • 25-oz. plastic bag packages of frozen "Tyson FULLY COOKED CRISPY CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT" with "BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019," case codes 3348CNQ0419, 3348CNQ0420, 3348CNQ0421, and 3348CNQ0422, and individual bag time stamps from 19:00 through 22:59 hours (inclusive).
  • 20-lb. cases of frozen "SPARE TIME FULLY COOKED, BUFFALO STYLE CHICKEN STRIPS CHICKEN BREAST STRIP FRITTERS WITH RIB MEAT AND BUFFALO STYLE SAUCE" with "BEST IF USED BY NOV 30 2019," and case code 3348CNQ03.


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