Quantcast

Jay-Z and Beyoncé Promote Vegan Lifestyle in Intro to New Book

Food
Beyoncé and Jay-Z performing in Seattle, Washington on Oct. 4, 2018. Ronald Woan / Flickr

The vegan movement just got two new influential advocates: Jay-Z and Beyoncé. In the introduction to a new book by Beyoncé's personal trainer, the music power-couple challenged their fans to eat more plant-based meals, People Magazine reported Monday.

The book, The Greenprint: Plant-Based Diet, Best Body, Better World, was written by Marco Borges and went on sale Dec. 31. Borges has teamed up with the couple before to promote limited vegan diets. In 2015, the three co-founded the 22 Days Nutrition challenge, which features only vegan food.


But in the introduction to Borges' new book, the couple talked about how their perspective had evolved from personal nutrition to planetary health.

"Having children has changed our lives more than anything else," they wrote, according to People. "We used to think of health as a diet—some worked for us, some didn't. Once we looked at health as the truth, instead of a diet, it became a mission for us to share that truth and lifestyle with as many people as possible."

The couple acknowledged that not everyone could or would implement an entirely vegan diet, but challenged fans to add as many plant-based meals to their routine as possible.

"We all have a responsibility to stand up for our health and the health of the planet. Let's take this stand together. Let's spread the truth. Let's make this mission a movement. Let's become 'The Greenprint,'" they concluded, as People reported.

The couples' challenge comes as more and more scientists are recommending people cut back on meat and dairy to fight climate change and support sustainable land use. A study published in April found that meat, egg and dairy consumption are responsible for almost 84 percent of food-based greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. In June, another major study of farming practices worldwide found that the most sustainable meat products did worse across five environmental indicators than the most intrusive vegetable and grain crops.

This point was emphasized by Borges in The Greenprint.

"Eating plant foods is the best thing any individual can do to save our environment and our planet," he said, according to the 22 Days Nutrition Twitter feed.

However, some responses on social media to the introduction pointed to the complexities involved when wealthy celebrities encourage lifestyle changes to people who lack their means.

"The accessibility to a plant-based diet isn't black and white, and neither is the overall discussion surrounding it," Tonja Renée Stidhum wrote for The Grapevine.

The couple has raised money for a variety of causes. When it comes to food and water access specifically, Beyoncé conducted food drives as part of her efforts to support survivors of Hurricane Katrina and partnered with various anti-hunger charities during her 2007 Beyoncé Experience tour, according to Look to the Stars. Jay-Z has worked to increase water access around the world since partnering with the UN for a Water for Life concert in 2006, according to Global Citizen.

Beyoncé has encouraged fans to join her in limited vegan diets before, most notably as she prepared for her 2018 performance in Coachella.

Borges told People he first tried a 22-day vegan diet with the pair in 2013.

"They loved it," Borges told People in a previous interview. "They walked away with a greater understanding of the powerful benefits of plant-based nutrition. They were getting people saying, 'Your skin has this glow.' And who doesn't like being told they look awesome?"

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Stuart Braun

A year after activist Greta Thunberg first stood in the rain outside the Swedish parliament with her now iconic "Skolstrejk för klimatet" — school strike for the climate — placard, the movement she spawned has set the tone for environmental protest action around the world.

Read More Show Less
Bruno Vincent / Staff / Getty Images

Toy maker Hasbro wants to play in the eco-packaging game. The board game giant will ditch its plastic packaging by 2022. The move means that games like Monopoly, Scrabble and Operation will no longer have shrink wrap, window sheets, plastic bags or elastic bands, as the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Vaping impaired the circulatory systems of people in a new study. bulentumut / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Vaping one time — even without nicotine — can damage blood vessels, reduce blood flow and create dangerous toxins, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology.

Read More Show Less
A man spreads pesticides on a plantation of vegetables in Rio de Janeiro Brazil. Ze Martinusso / Moment Open / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Pointing to the deaths of more than half a billion bees in Brazil over a period of just four months, beekeepers, experts and activists are raising concerns about the soaring number of new pesticides greenlighted for use by the Brazilian government since far-right President Jair Bolsonaro took office in January — and the threat that it poses to pollinators, people and the planet.

Read More Show Less
SHEALAH CRAIGHEAD

By Elliott Negin

On July 19, President Trump hosted Apollo 11 astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins and their families, along with the family of their deceased colleague Neil Armstrong, at a White House event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first manned landing on the moon.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The study looked at three groups of diverse lizards from South America. Daniel Pincheira-Donoso
  1. Cold-climate lizards that give live birth to their offspring are more likely to be driven to extinction than their egg-laying cousins as global temperatures continue to rise, new research suggests.
Read More Show Less
Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Denmark isn't interested in selling Greenland to the U.S., so now President Trump doesn't want to visit.

Read More Show Less
A stock photo of fire in the Amazon; a record number of fires have burned there this year. Brasil2 / E+ / Getty Images

There are a record number of wildfires burning in the Amazon rainforest, Brazil's space agency has said. Their smoke is visible from space and shrouded the city of São Paulo in darkness for about an hour Monday afternoon, CBS news reported.

Read More Show Less