Quantcast

Jay-Z and Beyoncé Promote Vegan Lifestyle in Intro to New Book

Food
Beyoncé and Jay-Z performing in Seattle, Washington on Oct. 4, 2018. Ronald Woan / Flickr

The vegan movement just got two new influential advocates: Jay-Z and Beyoncé. In the introduction to a new book by Beyoncé's personal trainer, the music power-couple challenged their fans to eat more plant-based meals, People Magazine reported Monday.

The book, The Greenprint: Plant-Based Diet, Best Body, Better World, was written by Marco Borges and went on sale Dec. 31. Borges has teamed up with the couple before to promote limited vegan diets. In 2015, the three co-founded the 22 Days Nutrition challenge, which features only vegan food.


But in the introduction to Borges' new book, the couple talked about how their perspective had evolved from personal nutrition to planetary health.

"Having children has changed our lives more than anything else," they wrote, according to People. "We used to think of health as a diet—some worked for us, some didn't. Once we looked at health as the truth, instead of a diet, it became a mission for us to share that truth and lifestyle with as many people as possible."

The couple acknowledged that not everyone could or would implement an entirely vegan diet, but challenged fans to add as many plant-based meals to their routine as possible.

"We all have a responsibility to stand up for our health and the health of the planet. Let's take this stand together. Let's spread the truth. Let's make this mission a movement. Let's become 'The Greenprint,'" they concluded, as People reported.

The couples' challenge comes as more and more scientists are recommending people cut back on meat and dairy to fight climate change and support sustainable land use. A study published in April found that meat, egg and dairy consumption are responsible for almost 84 percent of food-based greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. In June, another major study of farming practices worldwide found that the most sustainable meat products did worse across five environmental indicators than the most intrusive vegetable and grain crops.

This point was emphasized by Borges in The Greenprint.

"Eating plant foods is the best thing any individual can do to save our environment and our planet," he said, according to the 22 Days Nutrition Twitter feed.

However, some responses on social media to the introduction pointed to the complexities involved when wealthy celebrities encourage lifestyle changes to people who lack their means.

"The accessibility to a plant-based diet isn't black and white, and neither is the overall discussion surrounding it," Tonja Renée Stidhum wrote for The Grapevine.

The couple has raised money for a variety of causes. When it comes to food and water access specifically, Beyoncé conducted food drives as part of her efforts to support survivors of Hurricane Katrina and partnered with various anti-hunger charities during her 2007 Beyoncé Experience tour, according to Look to the Stars. Jay-Z has worked to increase water access around the world since partnering with the UN for a Water for Life concert in 2006, according to Global Citizen.

Beyoncé has encouraged fans to join her in limited vegan diets before, most notably as she prepared for her 2018 performance in Coachella.

Borges told People he first tried a 22-day vegan diet with the pair in 2013.

"They loved it," Borges told People in a previous interview. "They walked away with a greater understanding of the powerful benefits of plant-based nutrition. They were getting people saying, 'Your skin has this glow.' And who doesn't like being told they look awesome?"

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Indigenous people of various ethnic groups protest calling for demarcation of lands during the closing of the 'Red January - Indigenous Blood', in Paulista Avenue, in São Paulo, Brazil, Jan. 31, 2019. Cris Faga / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Raphael Tsavkko Garcia

Rarely has something so precious fallen into such unsafe hands. Since Jair Bolsonaro took the Brazilian presidency in 2019, the Amazon, which makes up 10 percent of our planet's biodiversity and absorbs an estimated 5 percent of global carbon emissions, has been hit with a record number of fires and unprecedented deforestation.

Read More
Microsoft's main campus in Redmond, Washington on May 12, 2017. GLENN CHAPMAN / AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft announced ambitious new plans to become carbon negative by 2030 and then go one step further and remove by 2050 all the carbon it has emitted since the company was founded in 1975, according to a company press release.

Read More
Sponsored
Nestlé is accelerating its efforts to bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and to address the global challenge of plastic packaging waste. Nestlé / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nestlé, the world's largest food company, said it will invest up to $2 billion to address the plastic waste crisis that it is largely responsible for.

Read More
Yellow soft shell D-vitamin capsule held to the sun. Helin Loik-Tomson / iStock / Getty Images

By Margherita T. Cantorna

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D, which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes, is essential for good health. Humans need vitamin D to keep healthy and to fight infections. The irony is that in winter, when people need vitamin D the most, most of us are not getting enough. So how much should we take? Should we take supplements? How do we get more? And, who needs it most?

Read More
The common murre population in Alaska has been decimated by an ocean heatwave. Linda Burek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

An expanse of uncommonly warm seawater in the Pacific Ocean created by a marine heatwave led to a mass die-off of one million seabirds, scientists have found.

Read More