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Ethical Barcode App Uses 20 Nonprofits to Ensure Sustainable Grocery Shopping

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Ethical Barcode App Uses 20 Nonprofits to Ensure Sustainable Grocery Shopping

Groups like the CSRHub, Sustainable Packaging Coalition and Free2Work provide immeasurable information about the products we purchase every day and what our purchases actually support, but how much of that information do you honestly retain in store aisles?

It's not always easy to remember which companies test on animals, use harmful chemicals or make genetically modified products. That's why an app developer has taken to smartphones to help us keep it all together before potentially spending hard-earned money on products that support causes that don't consider the planet or people.

Ethical Barcode harnesses information from about 20 nonprofits to help shoppers make environmentally friendly decisions. A quick scan of a product provides a snapshot of the manufacturer, its owner, an overall grade on those companies' ethics and the factors that comprise that grade. The percentage-based score also factors in certifications and recent news about particular companies.

Here are some examples of Ethical Barcode grades:

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"[Ethical Barcode] was built to enlighten customers about the brands they buy and the practices they are supporting as a result," according to the app's website. "By making informed purchases we all have a chance to inspire companies to share our values and passions."

Developer David Hamp-Gonsalves says any money generated from the free the app goes back into it to keep it alive. In the future, he hopes self-sustainability will make way for charitable contributions.

Available on Apple's App Store and Google Play, the app culls information from:

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