Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Cookbook Offers Plant-Based Recipes Inspired by Traditional Mexican and Central American Cuisine

Food
Cookbook Offers Plant-Based Recipes Inspired by Traditional Mexican and Central American Cuisine
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.


Listen here:

And Luz Calvo, professor of ethnic studies at Cal State East Bay, says that eating a plant-based diet has a long history for many Mexican people: "Our diet has … historically been rooted in eating very little meat or sometimes even no meat at all."

Calvo is co-author of a cookbook called "Decolonize Your Diet: Plant-Based Mexican-American Recipes for Health and Healing." The cookbook is based on a Mesoamerican diet – a diet that's largely composed of foods traditionally grown in Mexico and Central America, such as corn, beans, squash, and greens.

The recipes include, for example, green chile stew, pumpkin empanadas, sweet potato tacos, and enchiladas stuffed with potatoes, greens, and pumpkin seeds.

"Our hope is that our book provides plant-based recipes that are appealing to folks who have been raised eating Mexican food and are appreciating those flavors and smells and spices that are associated with their grandmother's or their great-grandmother's kitchens," Calvo said.

They say this kind of cooking can help people connect with an ancestral diet and eat in a way that is easier on the planet.

Reporting credit: Sarah Kennedy / ChavoBart Digital Media.

Molly Matthews Multedo co-leads the Pinyon Foundation, which produces educational radio and digital media projects for Spanish-speaking audiences in partnership with Hispanic Communications Network.

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Pexels

By Jessica Corbett

A new study is shedding light on just how much ice could be lost around Antarctica if the international community fails to urgently rein in planet-heating emissions, bolstering arguments for bolder climate policies.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found that over a third of the area of all Antarctic ice shelves — including 67% of area on the Antarctic Peninsula — could be at risk of collapsing if global temperatures soar to 4°C above pre-industrial levels.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less