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An Impossible Burger. Sarah Stierch / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jaydee Hanson

In the foodie world, 2019 might as well be named The Year of the Impossible Burger. This plant-based burger that "bleeds" can now be found on the menus of Burger King, Fatburger, Cheesecake Factory, Red Robin, White Castle and many other national restaurant chains. Consumers praise the burger's meat-like texture and the product is advertised as an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional beef burgers.

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A vegetarian bowl with quinoa fritters. Westend61 / Getty Images

By Ketura Persellin

You've likely heard that eating meat and poultry isn't good for your health or the planet. Recent news from Washington may make meat even less palatable: Pork inspections may be taken over by the industry itself, if a Trump administration proposal goes into effect, putting tests for deadly pathogens into the hands of the industry.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report predicts 35 percent of meat in 2040 will be "cultured" meat grown in vats. nevodka / Getty Images

The future of meat consumption doesn't lie with dead animals.

That's the conclusion drawn by a new report from consultancy firm AT Kearney, which predicts that 60 percent of "meat" in 2040 won't come from slaughtered animals. Instead, it will come from either lab-grown meat or plant-based replacements like Beyond Meat or Impossible Burger.

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Pexels

Experts have long warned of the health risks associated with red meat — including heart disease, cancer and diabetes — while white meat was seen as a healthier alternative. Now, new research suggests that both chicken and beef can impact blood cholesterol levels in the same way.

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Pexels

By Ketura Persellin

Global consumption of beef, lamb and goat is expected to rise by almost 90 percent between 2010 and 2050. But that doesn't mean you need to eat more meat. In fact, recent news from Washington gives you even less confidence in your meat: Pork inspections may be taken over by the industry itself, if a Trump administration proposal goes into effect, putting tests for deadly pathogens into the hands of line workers.

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An Impossible Whopper sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1 in Richmond Heights, Missouri. Michael Thomas / Getty Images

By Gigen Mammoser

Has a green revolution finally come for fast food?

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An Impossible Whopper sits on a table at a Burger King restaurant on April 1 in Richmond Heights, Missouri. Michael Thomas / Getty Images

Burger King plans to roll out the meatless Impossible Whopper at every one of its 7,200 U.S. branches by the end of the year, the company said Monday.

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T.Tseng / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

The Impossible Burger is a plant-based alternative to traditional meat-based burgers. It's said to mimic the flavor, aroma, and texture of beef.

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Vesnaandjic / iStock / Getty Images

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Selecting nutritious snacks to enjoy throughout the day is a key component of any healthy diet — including vegetarian diets.

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mariannehoy / iStock / Getty Images

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Water kefir is a beverage favored for both its fizzy flavor and impressive health benefits.

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The Impossible Burger. T.Tseng / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Mark R. O'Brian

People eat animals that eat plants. If we just eliminate that middle step and eat plants directly, we would diminish our carbon footprint, decrease agricultural land usage, eliminate health risks associated with red meat and alleviate ethical concerns over animal welfare. For many of us, the major hurdle to executing this plan is that meat tastes good. Really good. By contrast, a veggie burger tastes like, well, a veggie burger. It does not satisfy the craving because it does not look, smell or taste like beef. It does not bleed like beef.

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