Quantcast

National Day of Action Asks Applebee's for Plant-Based Menu Options

Food
One Meal a Day for the Planet / Center for Biological Diversity

One Meal a Day for the Planet and the Center for Biological Diversity Tuesday hosted events at Applebee's locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and Clearwater, Florida to ask the restaurant to add at least one plant-based entrée to all of its menus nationwide.


"Applebee's has an opportunity to show real leadership and concern for the health of customers and communities by adding plant-based options on its menu," said Ashley Schaeffer Yildiz, campaign manager at One Meal a Day for the Planet. "At a time when consumer taste buds are changing –– 22 percent of consumers are limiting meat, poultry or seafood, according to a recent study –– Applebee's can also take advantage of the growing demand for plant-based foods."

Event attendees served plant-based hamburger samples donated by Hungry Planet. Additionally, customers filled out comment cards and petitions were delivered urging the chain to offer healthy options free of meat and dairy.

Applebee's is the largest restaurant chain in the United States that does not offer a single vegetarian entrée on all its menus.

"We're calling on Applebee's to make a change to protect people and the planet," said Stephanie Feldstein, director of the Population and Sustainability Program at the Center for Biological Diversity. "Restaurants can play an important role in creating a more sustainable food system, but only if Earth-friendly, plant-based options are available on every menu across the country."

The day was the kickoff of a larger national campaign targeting restaurants, developed co-led by One Meal a Day for the Planet and the Center for Biological Diversity. Together the organizations will support individuals as they advocate for menu change across the country. The campaign is an effort to increase access to plant-based foods for better health and to take action for the planet.

The price of eating meat and dairy is well documented:

  • Animal agriculture is a leading cause of climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss and water pollution worldwide.
  • Eating excessive animal protein comes with increased risk of chronic illnesses including heart disease, diabetes and some cancers.

For more information on the campaign and to take the petition, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Elva Etienne / Moment / Getty Images

By Ketura Persellin

Gift-giving is filled with minefields, but the Environmental Working Group's (EWG) got your back, so you don't need to worry about inadvertently giving family members presents laden with toxic chemicals. With that in mind, here are our suggestions for gifts to give your family this season.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Cheri Bantilan MS, RD, CD

Garlic is an ingredient that provides great flavor to dishes and can be found in most kitchens across the globe.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Claire O'Connor

Agriculture is on the front lines of climate change. Whether it's the a seven-year drought drying up fields in California, the devastating Midwest flooding in 2019, or hurricane after hurricane hitting the Eastern Shore, agriculture and rural communities are already feeling the effects of a changing climate. Scientists expect climate change to make these extreme weather events both more frequent and more intense in coming years.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Echinacea is a group of flowering plants that belong to the daisy family, along with plants like sunflowers, chicory, chamomile, and chrysanthemums.

Read More Show Less
One of the 25 new Long Beach Transit hybrid gasoline-electric buses on April 23, 2009. Jeff Gritchen / Digital First Media / Orange County Register / Getty Images

In Long Beach, California, some electric buses can charge along their route without cords or wires.

When a bus reaches the Pine Avenue station, it parks over a special charging pad. While passengers get on and off, the charger transfers energy to a receiver on the bottom of the bus.

Read More Show Less