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10 Slides Show Why EVs Are Charging Into the Future

Business

There are no shortage of reasons why you should embrace electric vehicles now or at least make plans to do so.

Research shows they could wind up preventing more than 18 million tons of carbon dioxide per year. The industry is backed by trusted automakers as well as burgeoning innovators ready to make clean-energy advances. Also, their sales are better than ever.

If you need more reasons, Fix.com has you covered with an infographic, Leave the Gas at the Station: Electric Cars Charge into the Future, broken into slides. They fill you in on different types of EVs, the hottest carmakers and the range of miles you can travel per charge

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