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Watch: Not Even the FDA Knows What's in Your Food

Food

The Center for the Public Integrity made a video this week about a legal loophole that allows food companies to add new ingredients to foods with no government safety review. Using a 57-year-old law, companies can "declare their ingredients are 'generally recognized as safe' and add them to foods without ever even telling federal regulators," according to the Center for Public Integrity.

The biggest concern comes from new food additives. "People are consuming foods with added flavors, preservatives and other ingredients that are not at all reviewed by regulators for immediate dangers or long-term health effects," says the Center for Public Integrity.

Despite cases of hospitalization and even death from ingredients such as lupin, mycoprotein and carrageenan, these foods are still "generally recognized as safe."

Watch the Center for Public Integrity's video here:

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