Quantcast

Tips for a Healthy (Even Vegan) Cookout

Food

Will you be marking the Fourth of July holiday with a classic summertime cookout?

Planning a holiday cookout? Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Or will you be going vegetarian, vegan or even gluten-free at your BBQ? If that’s the case, here are some pointers for July 4 and throughout the summer.

If you feel the holiday just won’t be complete without firing up the grill, but you don’t want to down burgers and dogs, then check out One Green Planet’s 30 epic vegan-friendly grilling ideas, from grilled artichoke and quinoa lettuce wraps to red lentil burgers with kale pesto (which you can follow up with 30 vegan desserts, from grilled fruit kebabs to cardamom rose cupcakes (who doesn’t love cardamom?)).

Not sure that anything coming off the grill could taste as good as a cheeseburger? Read this recipe for grilled avocado with salsa and see if your mouth doesn’t water.

Ok, say you want a more traditional cookout, but you want to skip a lot of the fat, cholesterol and salt that accompanies burgers, chips, potato salad and other BBQ offerings. Take traditional picnic foods and put a healthy twist on it, such as swapping out a mayo-based macaroni salad with a Greek pasta salad with red wine vinaigrette, and deviled eggs with avocado stuffed eggs.

Here are some tips for a healthier traditional cookout from the Cleveland Clinic:

 Choose a Lean Entrée

Try a healthy veggie burger. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Instead of high-fat hamburgers and hot dogs, choose lower-fat proteins. It’ll be a great change-up from traditional cookout foods, and your guests will be delighted. Here are some tasty entrée ideas:

  • Fresh fish can be grilled whole, in steaks or filets, or on a kebob. Salmon, grouper, shrimp and tuna are great grilling options.

  • Whole chicken or chicken breasts can be made in a variety of ways, like marinating with chipotle seasoning, vinaigrettes, barbecue sauce, jerk sauce or Cajun seasoning. If using chicken with skin, remove the skin before eating.

  • Lean pork or beef tenderloin, trimmed of fat.

  • Vegetable-based burgers. Portobello, black bean, roasted vegetable or burgers made with textured vegetable protein are flavorful options.

  • Grilled vegetables make for a great entrée themselves, especially veggies with hearty flavors like portobello mushrooms, squash, onions and peppers.

  • Turkey or chicken burgers made with all-white-meat ground turkey or chicken.

Lighten up the Salad

How about a flavorful vinaigrette instead of a creamy dressing on your salad? Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Liven up pasta and potato salad with these ideas to limit saturated fat:

  • Add grilled, raw or roasted vegetables. They’ll help bulk up the salad while lowering the calorie count.

  • Use a flavorful vinaigrette dressing instead of a creamy dressing. Try a mixture of extra virgin olive oil, an acid (such as lemon juice, red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar) and fresh herbs and spices.

  • If you just can’t do without the creamy potato salad, substitute full-fat mayonnaise with light mayo or light sour cream. Use small amounts of creamy toppings and add flavor with pickle juice, lemon juice or fresh herbs.

  • Try using spicy arugula pesto or traditional basil pesto sauce in your pasta salad for a refreshing, healthy change.

  • Choose whole wheat farfalle (bowtie), penne (tubular) or fusilli (spiral) pasta instead of enriched pasta. Or, make the salad using half enriched pasta and half whole wheat pasta.

  • Dijon mustard is a great addition to vinaigrettes, as are rice wine, balsamic and champagne vinegars. To give a southwestern pasta salad some kick, add some adobo sauce or chopped chipotle peppers.

Read Page 1

Add a Healthy Side Dish

Cherry tomato, mozzarella and basil kebabs. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Instead of high-fat potato chips and other unhealthy snacks, try some of these ideas:

  • Fresh fruit kebobs. Put fresh strawberries, melon, grapes and pineapple on skewers, or toss it all into a big bowl and enjoy!

  • Mozzarella, cherry tomato and basil kebobs are delicious! You can also layer the ingredients on a tray and sprinkle with olive oil and balsamic vinegar for a refreshing side dish.

  • Instead of fried chips, try serving veggie chips, but not the bagged kinds! Thinly slice jicama, carrot coins, zucchini and cucumber and serve with hummus.

  • Zesty corn and black bean salad.

  • Serve baked tortilla chips with fresh salsa or guacamole.

  • Make a beautiful array of grilled vegetables and serve warm or at room temperature.

  • Serve corn on the cob with a variety of toppings like lime juice and grated parmesan cheese.

  • Prepare a tricolor salad made with radicchio, endive and arugula. Toss with a red wine vinaigrette dressing.

  • Offer fresh whole wheat pita with olives, tabbouleh salad and hummus.

Go Light on the Drinks

Try some unsweetened iced tea with mint or lemon. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Instead of high-calorie, sugary drinks, try offering these refreshing choices:

  • Ice water with cucumber and lemon slices.

  • Sparkling water “spiked” with a dash of 100 percent fruit juice.

  • Fresh squeezed lemonade with a small amount of sugar.

  • Black or green unsweetened tea.

What are some of your favorite healthy cookout dishes?

 

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Mark Wilson / Getty Images News

Ethics investigations have been opened into the conduct of senior Trump appointees at the nation's top environmental agencies.

The two investigations focus on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler and six high-ranking officials in the Department of Interior (DOI), The Hill reported Tuesday. Both of them involve the officials' former clients or employers.

"This is demonstrative of the failures at the very top of this administration to set an ethical tone," Campaign Legal Center Ethics Counsel Delaney Marsco told The Washington Post of the DOI investigation. "When people come to work for government, they're supposed to work on behalf of the public. It's a betrayal of the public trust when senior political appointees seem to give privileged access to their former employers or former clients."

Read More Show Less
Cigarette butt litter. Tavallai / CC BY-ND 2.0

By Dipika Kadaba

We've known for more than 50 years that smoking cigarettes comes with health hazards, but it turns out those discarded butts are harmful for the environment, too. Filtered cigarette butts, although small, contain dozens of chemicals, including arsenic and benzene. These toxins can leach into the ground or water, creating a potentially deadly situation for nearby birds, fish and other wildlife.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Thanasis Zovoilis / DigitalVision / Getty Images

Infants less than a year old should not be exposed to electronic screens, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
Bill Pugliano / Getty Images

By Wenonah Hauter

Five years ago this week, an emergency manager appointed by then-Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder made the devastating decision to save money by switching Flint's water supply over from Detroit's water system to the Flint River. Seen as a temporary fix, the new water supply was not properly treated. High levels of lead leached from the old pipes, poisoning a generation of Flint's children, and bacteria responsible for an outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease killed more than a dozen residents.

Read More Show Less
Los Angeles-Long Beach, California is listed as the nation's smoggiest city. Pixabay

Seven million more Americans lived in areas with unhealthy levels of air pollution between 2015 and 2017 than between 2014 and 2016, and climate change is partly to blame, Time reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Kissing bug. Pavel Kirillov / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed that the kissing bug, which can transmit a potentially deadly parasite, has spread to Delaware, ABC News reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less
"Take the pledge today." Screenshot / StopFoodWasteDay.com

Did you know that more than a third of food is wasted or thrown away every year? And that only 25 percent of it would be enough to feed the 795 million undernourished people in the world? That's why today is Stop Food Waste Day, a chance to reflect on what you can do to waste less of the food you buy.

Stop Food Waste Day is an initiative of food service company Compass Group. It was launched first in the U.S, in 2017 and went global the year after, making today it's second worldwide celebration.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Berries are among the healthiest foods you can eat.

Read More Show Less