Quantcast

Soy Meat Is Soy Yesterday: 5 New and Better Options

Food
Shutterstock

By Katie O'Reilly

Vegetarians, vegans and flexitarians are no longer satisfied with the soy-reliant faux meat of yesterday. Soybeans are almost always genetically modified, and they also contain phytoestrogens, which may increase the risk of some cancers.


The good news? Plant-based-food producers have achieved the Holy Grail: savory burgers, deli slices, barbecue and even imitation seafood made from fruits, veggies and other legumes.

1. Beyond Meat

Beyond Meat has made waves in the vegan community ever since Beyond Burgers—crafted with pea protein, beets, coconut oil and potato starch—started showing up alongside beef in the meat aisle. Packed with 20 grams of protein and free from GMOs, soy and cholesterol, these burgers don't just look and taste like meat—they literally bleed beet juice. The quarter-pound patties are available in most major grocery stores and are gradually upping the ante on meatlessness at burger chains across the country. $6 for two patties.

2. Upton's Naturals

Jackfruit trees yield nutrient-dense fruit with a meaty texture. Upton's Naturals supplies heat-and-serve varieties in flavors like Bar-B-Que and Sriracha. $5 per box.

3. Sophie's Kitchen

Something's fishy in the vegan aisle—Sophie's Kitchen makes soy- and wheat-free shrimp alternatives from pea protein and konjac, a.k.a. elephant yam. $5 a package.

4. Lightlife

Unlike imitation turkey and ham, Lightlife deli slices are reminiscent of hummus and make for yummy, filling sandwiches. About $3.50 for a package of 12 slices.

5. Maika Foods

With a mission to preserve veggies' flavors, hues and nutrients, Maika Foods offers vibrant burgers made from carrots, green peas and beets. $5 for four patties.

Reposted with permission from our media associate SIERRA Magazine.

RECOMMENDED

How Cities Can Meat the Climate Challenge

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pixnio

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many types of flour are commonly available on the shelves of your local supermarket.

Read More Show Less
A visitor views a digital representation of the human genome at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Mario Tama / Getty Images

Genetics are significantly more responsible for driving autism spectrum disorders than maternal factors or environmental factors such as vaccines and chemicals, according to a massive new study involving more than 2 million people from five different countries.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Emilie Karrick Surrusco

Across the globe, extreme weather is becoming the new normal.

Read More Show Less