Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Meet Erin Brockovich, Consumer Advocate and Self-Proclaimed ‘Eco Warrior'

Business

If the name Erin Brockovich only reminds you of a 2000 feature film starring Julia Roberts, you've got some catching up to do.

The Lawrence, KS native is a consumer advocate and environmental activist who took it upon herself to create a national reporting registry map where Americans can keep record of various health concerns and ailments brought on by the environments they live in. She did so simply because the government never made such a comprehensive tool available.

Brockovich, a consultant for Weitz & Luxenberg, a New York-based mesothelioma and asbestos law firm, loves galvanizing people to stand up for their beliefs. She told as much to IAMECO Warrior when the site saw her at the annual Captain Planet Foundation Gala, where she received the Protector of the Earth award.

Nearly 20 years after building a famous case against Pacific Gas and Electric Company for groundwater contamination, Brockovich and her team have launched investigations on GM, Liptor and the cause behind the Louisiana Sinkhole.

Yes, Brockovich is an "Eco Warrior and damn proud of it." She loves scenes where people won't be quieted by politicians or business executives, especially when it comes to their health and concern for the environment. That's why she rallied with military veterans and watchdog groups in April against the U.S. Department of Justice's treatment of a case regarding toxic drinking water at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC.

"[Your] local city council has no idea what's going on with you," she said. "In numbers, you go tell them what's wrong with you. I've sat there when I've watched 3,000 and 4,000 people march into a city council meeting and the members are like, ‘what the F just happened?'"

Visit Brockovich's site, which features videos clips, consumer alerts and updates on her latest investigations.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Several flower species, including the orchid, can recover quickly from severe injury, scientists have found. cunfek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Calling someone a delicate flower may not sting like it used to, according to new research. Scientists have found that many delicate flowers are actually remarkably hearty and able to bounce back from severe injury.

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 727 flies over approach lights with a trail of black-smoke from the engines on April 9, 2018. aviation-images.com / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

With global air travel at a near standstill, the airline industry is looking to rewrite the rules it agreed to tackle global emissions. The Guardian reports that the airline is billing it as a matter of survival, while environmental activists are accusing the industry of trying to dodge their obligations.

Read More Show Less
A National Guard member works on election day at a polling location on April 7, 2020 in Madison, Wisconsin. Andy Manis / Getty Images.

ByJulia Baumel

The outbreak of COVID-19 across the U.S. has touched every facet of our society, and our democracy has been no exception.

Read More Show Less