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Make Sure the Products You're Putting on Your Body Are Not Toxic

Health + Wellness

By Cassidy Randall, MADE SAFE

Products with a new certification that aims to solve the chemical conundrum for consumers are hitting store shelves this spring. The MADE SAFE (Made with Safe Ingredients) seal empowers shoppers to find and purchase items for use on their bodies, for their babies and in their homes that have been screened for known toxic chemicals.

Studies show that everyday exposure to personal care and household products are linked to some serious human health harm, from styrene in Always pads, halogenated flame retardants in popular car seats and the Teflon chemical in L'Oreal anti-aging creams. Studies also show that people can actively improve their health by decreasing exposures—and for the most vulnerable populations of pregnant women, babies and young children, reducing exposures can mean the difference between a healthy life and one filled with disease and/or mental challenges.

But it's hard to reduce exposures when people have no idea what's safe and what's not. MADE SAFE changes that. As America's first human health-focused seal to cross consumer product categories, certified products can be found across store aisles, from baby to personal care to household. For the first time, people know at the point of purchase which products aren't made with toxic chemicals known to harm human health.

MADE SAFE literally means made with safe ingredients not known to harm human health. The process runs ingredients through its Toxicant Database, made up of scientifically authoritative lists from organizations and agencies from around the world, of known harmful chemicals that includes known carcinogens, behavioral, reproductive and neuro toxins, hormone disruptors, heavy metals, pesticides, insecticides, flame retardants, toxic solvents and harmful VOCs.

With more than 84,000 chemicals in use today and little to no public data on their impact to human health, MADE SAFE goes beyond “red lists" to look at ingredients for bioaccumulation (builds up in our bodies), persistence (builds up in the environment) and for general as well as aquatic toxicity using modeling, predictive analysis and available science. With these steps, the certification goes beyond standard practice with an aim to alter the way products are made in this country.

Founding brands of the MADE SAFE seal include Naturepedic for baby, kids and adult mattresses; Alaffia, Annmarie Skin Care, Just So Natural Products, SW Basics and True Nature Botanicals for personal care; Rejuva Minerals for cosmetics; Good Clean Love and Sustain Naturals for sexual health; and healthy hoohoo for feminine care.

Products that have passed MADE SAFE will have the option of moving on to NONTOXIC CERTIFIEDTM, in which they're lab-tested in totality to ensure that no new toxins are formed in mixture, there's no supply chain contamination and to validate the screening in a lab environment. Pura Stainless (baby, kids and sport bottles) is pioneering this certification.

MADE SAFE is designed as a market tool to eliminate toxic chemicals by making it easy for people to find and buy products made without known toxic chemicals, giving companies a road map to making safer products and making it easy for retailers to select the safer products their customers want.

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