Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Apple Responds to Trump's Paris Exit With $1 Billion Green Bond

Business
Apple Responds to Trump's Paris Exit With $1 Billion Green Bond

Apple Inc. issued a $1 billion "green bond" on Tuesday, the first U.S. corporation to make such an offer in response to President Donald Trump's withdrawal of the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

Proceeds from bond sales will finance renewable energy projects and other environmental initiatives at Apple facilities and in its supply chain.


Last year, the iPhone maker issued a record $1.5 billion in green bonds after the signing of the landmark accord. The aim of the second bond is to show that companies are still committed to the 2015 global agreement.

"Leadership from the business community is essential to address the threat of climate change and protect our shared planet," Lisa Jackson, Apple's vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives, said in a statement.

The tech giant has worked hard to shrink its global carbon footprint in recent years. Apple announced two months ago that 96 percent of the electricity used at its global facilities came from renewable energy. The company is working towards 100 percent renewable goal.

According to Reuters, Apple allocated $442 million last year to 16 different projects from renewable energy to recycling from its first bond offer.

Tim Cook, Apple's chief executive, spoke out against Trump's June 1 announcement to exit the Paris deal.

"I spoke with President Trump on Tuesday and tried to persuade him to keep the U.S. in the agreement. But it wasn't enough," Cook wrote then in an email to employees.

Cook also noted the company's continued commitment to protect the environment.

"We power nearly all of our operations with renewable energy, which we believe is an example of something that's good for our planet and makes good business sense as well," he said.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less

Trending

About EcoWatch

A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less
A rare bird not seen for 170 years has turned up in Borneo's South Kalimantan province in Indonesia. robas / Getty Images

In October 2020, two men living in Indonesia's South Kalimantan province on Borneo managed to catch a bird that they had never seen before. They photographed and released it, then sent the pictures to birdwatching organizations in the area for identification.

Read More Show Less