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View of the damage caused by Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Florida, on Oct. 13. HECTOR RETAMAL / AFP / Getty Images

As Scientists Sound Climate Change Alarm, States Lead on Solutions

By Abigail Dillen

This column originally appeared in USA Today.

The world's leading panel of climate experts sounded the alarm this week that we are running out of time to get rising temperatures under control. Its latest report calls for "rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented" steps to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, from worsening wildfires and extreme drought to rising sea levels and more powerful storms. It also reminds us what is at stake if we fail to act: our health, our food and water security, our environment and our economy.

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Trump at the 2018 Conservative Political Action Conference in National Harbor, MD on Feb. 23. Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

Trump Accuses Climate Scientists of Having 'Political Agenda'

President Donald Trump once again cast doubt on human contribution to climate change and accused climate scientists of having a "political agenda" during his interview with CBS' 60 Minutes on Sunday.

"Do you still think that climate change is a hoax?" correspondent Lesley Stahl asked the president point-blank.

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Hurricane Florence caused flooded roads in Mullins, SC on Sept. 20. U.S. Army National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Jorge Intriago

We’re Running Out of Time

By Rhea Suh

A widening madness threatens the world, only one thing can avert catastrophe, and we're running out of time.

That's no Hollywood action film trailer. It's the sobering and all-too-real warning sounded by the world's top climate scientists in an authoritative report released this week. We can still prevent runaway climate disaster, they conclude, but only by taking "rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented" action now to shift to cleaner, smarter ways to power our future. We can do this, the report says, but we have about a decade—tops—to get it right.

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Donald Trump speaking at the 2018 Conservative Political Action Conference on Feb. 23. Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

'Who Drew It?' Trump Belittles UN Climate Report

President Donald Trump cast skepticism about the landmark report from the United Nations' scientific panel on how the world has just over a decade to limit catastrophic global warming.

"It was given to me. And I want to look at who drew it. You know, which group drew it. I can give you reports that are fabulous and I can give you reports that aren't so good," Trump told reporters on Tuesday from the South Lawn at the White House.

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Waves from a powerful storm batter Atlantic City on Oct. 4, 2015. Jessica Kourkounis / Getty Images

Seas Could Rise 8 Feet by 2100 Without Urgent Action to Curb Climate Change

If no meaningful action is taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions, global sea levels could rise eight feet by 2100 and a full 50 feet by 2300.

That was the most dramatic finding of a study conducted by scientists at Rutgers University, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and Boston College and published in the Annual Review of Environment and Resources this month.

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Flooding in Dhaka, Bangladesh, one of eight cities especially vulnerable to sea level rise. Michael Hall / Photolibrary / Getty Images

8 World Cities That Could Be Underwater as Oceans Rise

If global temperatures rise above 1.5° Celsius above pre-industrial levels—the ideal temperature limit set by the Paris agreement—global sea levels will rise by more than 40 centimeters (approximately 15.7 inches) by 2100. If temperatures top 2° Celsius, sea level rise will be more than 50 centimeters (approximately 20 inches) by century's end. This could be devastating to coastal cities around the world that are already vulnerable to storms and flooding because of geological or urban planning factors.

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David Attenborough: 'Population Growth Must Come to an End'

Renowned naturalist David Attenborough sat down with BBC Newsnight for a wide-ranging interview about the environment and how the planet cannot accommodate the "alarming rate" of human overpopulation.

"One of the reasons that the population has increased as fast as it has is that people like me are living longer than we did," Attenborough explained. "And so there are more and more people just because the expectancy of life has increased."

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Oil Refinery in Corpus Christi, Texas along the Texas Gulf Coast. iStock / Getty Images Plus

Trump’s NAFTA Replacement Ignores Climate Change, Favors Fossil Fuel Interests

After 14 months of negotiations, the U.S., Mexico and Canada agreed on a revised trade agreement Sunday that does not mention climate change or global warming, Canada's National Observer reported.

The deal, which still has to be approved by the legislative bodies of all three countries, is a replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which U.S. President Donald Trump had vowed to renegotiate or scrap altogether during his campaign.

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Aerial Photos of flooding caused by Hurricane Florence. S.C. Air National Guard

Scientists, Governments Discuss Crucial IPCC Report on Climate Change

The United Nations' 48th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) opened its crucial meeting in Incheon, South Korea on Monday to deliver the authoritative, scientific guide for governments to stave off disastrous climate change.

"This is one of the most important meetings in the IPCC's history," chair Hoesung Lee of South Korea said in his opening remarks.

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