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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
A schoolchildren crossing sign is seen in front of burned trees in Mallacoota, Australia on Jan. 15, 2020. Luis Ascui / Getty Images

By Bhiamie Williamson, Francis Markham and Jessica Weir

The catastrophic bushfire season is officially over, but governments, agencies and communities have failed to recognize the specific and disproportionate impact the fires have had on Aboriginal peoples.

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A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A woman watches as she takes shelter at the beach as smoke from a bushfire is seen in Batemans Bay in New South Wales on Jan. 4. PETER PARKS / AFP / Getty Images

The Australian wildfires that burned for five months and destroyed millions of acres also killed 33 people. However, the smoke from the fires killed 12.6 times as many people. New research has shown that smoke from the fires killed 417 people and caused thousands of hospitalizations between October and February, as CBS News reported.

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Koalas are clinging to life in bushfire-ravaged Australia, as seen here on Jan. 9, 2020. Ninian Reed / CC BY 2.0

Australian conservation groups are asking the government to declare koalas endangered after the devastating wildfires this summer killed thousands of them and destroyed 45 million acres of bush that they call home, according to a new report from the conservation group International Fund for Animal Welfare.

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A fire burns in New South Wales, Australia in November of 2019. Dean Sewell / The Sydney Morning Herald via Getty Images

The climate crisis played a significant role in Australia's devastating wildfire season, a group of researchers has confirmed.

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Demonstrators hold up placards outside the Australian Open venue during a climate protest rally in Melbourne on Jan.y 24. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP / Getty Images

The climate crisis has now stretched Australia's summers twice as long as its winters, a new report has found.

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The Bunda cliff face along the Great Australian Bight near the South Australian-Western Australian border. Robbie Goodall / Moment / Getty Images

By Andy Rowel

For those fighting the oil industry, the good news keeps on coming this week.

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A general view of fire damaged country in the The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area near the town of Blackheath on Feb. 21, 2020 in Blackheath, Australia. Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

In a post-mortem of the Australian bushfires, which raged for five months, scientists have concluded that their intensity and duration far surpassed what climate models had predicted, according to a study published yesterday in Nature Climate Change.

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Half half bleached coral, great barrier reef. JAYNE JENKINS / CORAL REEF IMAGE BANK

Australian wildlife cannot catch a break.

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Images taken during the bushfire crisis are projected on the sails of the Sydney Opera House on Jan 11, 2020 in Sydney, Australia. Don Arnold / Getty Images

After a "devastating" wildfire season, all of the bushfires in Australia's most populous state of New South Wales (NSW) are now contained.

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People commute to work on Feb.07 in Sydney, Australia. A severe weather warning is in place for Sydney and most of the NSW coast, with 130mm of rain predicted in Sydney alone. Brendon Thorne / Getty Images

The fire ravaged state of New South Wales in Australia received much-needed torrential downpours that doused active fires, reducing the total number by a third, as The Guardian reported. The number of active fires dropped from more than 60 to 42 in just one day.

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