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7 Reasons to Eat Swiss Chard (The Ultimate Superfood)

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7 Reasons to Eat Swiss Chard (The Ultimate Superfood)

If you're not on the Swiss chard bandwagon, you will be after watching this short video by ActiveBeat. Swiss chard is one of the healthiest leafy green vegetables, according to the video's narrator Tyler. Just 100 grams of Swiss chard will give you more than 300 percent of your daily dose of vitamin K, more than 20 percent of your vitamin C and more than 20 percent of your vitamin A.

Wow, that's one heck of a nutrient-dense superfood. Watch the video to learn why you've got to be eating this leafy green:

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