Quantcast

World's First Smart Microhabitat Grows Just About Anything

Food

Growing plants indoors can sometimes be a challenge for amateur gardeners, but with the Biopod, the world's first smart microhabitat, you can grow your own herbs, vegetables—and even a rainforest—in your own home.

Biopod's app-controlled terrarium allows you to monitor everything from lighting to watering with your smartphone. Photo credit: Biopod

What makes this tank so great for growing plants indoors? Basically, the environment inside the BioPod can be customized to meet the ideal conditions for whatever you happen to be growing.

The tank comes with an app for both IOS and Android phones that allows you to regulate temperature, lighting, humidity, ventilation and even artificial rainfall via Wi-Fi.

This low-maintenance tank is also ideal for those of you who have pet fish or reptiles. While it does not help feed your pets, the BioPod does have a built-in high definition camera so you can check on whatever is happening inside while you are away from home.

The tank is the brainchild of Canadian biologist and BioPod founder Jared Wolfe. Wolfe's original intention with the BioPod was to duplicate rainforest habitats in order to help save endangered frogs.

There are currently three versions of the tank in development. The Biopod One is ideal for herb or vegetable gardens or small animals. The larger Biopod Terra does the same thing but holds more or larger plants and pets.

Finally, the largest tank, the Biopod Aqua, works like a complete ecosystem that can hold plants and fish. The Aqua can also handle aquaponics, which is a hybrid farming method that combines fish (and their waste) and plants (which filter fish waste) to grow food for you to eat.

"Unlike current vivariums and aquariums, Biopod's technology allows for a natural free flowing system that replicates how a real environment operates," the company boasts on its website. "This system allows plants and animals to thrive while keeping the maintenance of a Biopod low."

The built-in bells and whistles on the Biopod can replicate the climate of a tropical rainforest. Photo credit: Biopod

The company is in the final stages of development and has 17 days to go on an already successful crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter, raising $170,104 (much more than its original $22,783 goal).

The makers of the Biopod also want the tank to be an educational tool for students to learn about nature and ecosystems.

"Teachers and students can see different aspects of their environment including soil conditions, gas levels and moisture—all in real time," the company says.

If all goes as planned, Kickstarter backers should get their tanks by December. Check out BioPod's Kickstarter video below to learn more about the product.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Revolutionary ‘Magic Tent’ Combines Tent, Sleeping Bag and Pad in One

Finally … Uber for Bicycles Is Here

Former WWII Bomb Shelter Now World’s First Underground Farm

Solar-Powered Beach Mat Charges Your Phone and Chills Your Beverages

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixabay

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Pears are sweet, bell-shaped fruits that have been enjoyed since ancient times. They can be eaten crisp or soft.

Read More Show Less
Photon-Photos / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The desert of Australia's Northern Territory has the iconic Ayers Rock, but not much else. Soon, it may be known as home to the world's largest solar farm, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 737-800 BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter) is marked "Prime Air" as part of Amazon Prime's freight aircraft during the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France on June 22. Mustafa Yalcin / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

It's Prime Day! The day when thousands of increasingly absurd items are discounted so deeply that you suddenly need items you never knew existed. Yes, I do need a hotdog shaped toaster next to me while I watch this Fast & Furious seven movie box set! And I need it in my house today!

Read More Show Less

By Peter Sinclair

The weather in many areas across the U.S. has been – and certainly throughout America's heartland was for much of the past winter and spring – frightful.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
There's a short window between when a tick bites and when it passes on bacteria or virus. MSU Ag Communications, Courtesy Dr. Tina Nations, CC BY-ND

By Jerome Goddard

When it comes to problems caused by ticks, Lyme disease hogs a lot of the limelight. But various tick species carry and transmit a collection of other pathogens, some of which cause serious, even fatal, conditions.

Read More Show Less
tomosang / Moment / Getty Images

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

Say goodbye to one of the dreamiest things about childhood. In the Midwest, fireflies are dying off.

Read More Show Less
A new Climate Emergency Fund contains more than $625,000 which will go to grassroots climate action groups like Extinction Rebellion and students who have organized weekly climate strikes all over the world. @ExtinctionR / Twitter

By Julia Conley

Heeding the call of grassroots campaigners, several wealthy philanthropists announced Friday a new fund that will raise money for climate action groups around the world.

Read More Show Less