Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Why Is It Legal to Cause Fracking Earthquakes In Colorado?

Energy

This falls in the “You Can’t Make This Shit Up” category in Colorado.

Yesterday it was reported that a fracking waste company—NGL Water Solutions DJ LLC—that was linked to causing earthquakes is allowed by Gov. John Hickenlooper’s appointed oil and gas commission to increase their fracking waste injection operations, and it was determined that the company did not violate any law or rule when they likely caused the earthquakes.

Further, not only are the fracking waste injections increasing, but the earthquakes are continuing, the biggest of which, in May 2014, was a 3.4 on the richter scale that shook homes and rattled nerves across the region. And, the director of the Governor’s oil and gas commission stated, “We have actively managed this particular circumstance in a way that we feel comfortable with.”

You can read the latest on this Colorado earthquake morass in the BizWest newspaper.

A few months ago, when it was reported that this company was allowed to increase its fracking waste injections, I said in a media report, "They are resuming injection of toxic fracking waste under Greeley even though they think it's connected to the earthquakes. This is consistent with the industry's business model to frack first, grab all the money, and leave the problems for taxpayers and homeowners to clean up."

You have to continue to wonder just how far the complete control of the Colorado political apparatus by the oil and gas industry can go.

You’d think that Gov. Hickenlooper would want to protect the citizens of Colorado from earthquakes. You’d think that at least one—just oneColorado state senator or state representative would stand up and propose to change the law to make it illegal to cause earthquakes. The state legislature is in session right now, but I have not heard one peep from an actual lawmaker.

The very same day that this news report surfaced, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists from the University of Chicago changed their “Doomsday Clock” from being “5 minutes before midnight” to “3 minutes before midnight.” In so doing, they ranted against the failure of political leadership to address the environmental problems facing the planet, and said, “These failures of leadership endanger every person on Earth.”

C’mon Colorado lawmakers, I challenge you to change the law and make it illegal to cause earthquakes!

Gary Wockner, PhD, is an environmental activist in Colorado. Contact: Gary@GaryWockner.com.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Worst Fracking Wastewater Spill in North Dakota Leaks 3 Million Gallons Into River

11 Earthquakes Rock Texas Fracking Heartland in 24 Hours

Fracking Confirmed as Cause of Ohio Earthquake

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

More than 1,000 people were told to evacuate their homes when a wildfire ignited in the foothills west of Denver Monday, Colorado Public Radio reported.

Read More Show Less

Accessibility to quality health care has dropped for millions of Americans who lost their health insurance due to unemployment. mixetto / E+ / Getty Images

Accessibility to quality health care has dropped for millions of Americans who lost their health insurance due to unemployment. New research has found that 5.4 million Americans were dropped from their insurance between February and May of this year. In that three-month stretch more Americans lost their coverage than have lost coverage in any entire year, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
Heat waves are most dangerous for older people and those with health problems. Global Jet / Flickr / CC by 2.0

On hot days in New York City, residents swelter when they're outside and in their homes. The heat is not just uncomfortable. It can be fatal.

Read More Show Less
Nearly 250 U.S. oil and gas companies are expected to file for bankruptcy by the end of next year. Joshua Doubek / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Fracking companies are going bankrupt at a rapid pace, often with taxpayer-funded bonuses for executives, leaving harm for communities, taxpayers, and workers, the New York Time reports.

Read More Show Less
Trump introduces EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler during an event to announce changes to the National Environmental Policy Act, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Jan. 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. The changes would make it easier for federal agencies to approve infrastructure projects without considering climate change. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

A report scheduled for release later Tuesday by Congress' non-partisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) finds that the Trump administration undervalues the costs of the climate crisis in order to push deregulation and rollbacks of environmental protections, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
The American Federation of Teachers (AFT), National Education Association (NEA), and AASA, The School Superintendents Association, voiced support for safe reopening measures. www.vperemen.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA

By Kristen Fischer

It's going to be back-to-school time soon, but will children go into the classrooms?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) thinks so, but only as long as safety measures are in place.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Critics charge the legislation induces poor communities to sell off their water rights. Pexels

By Eoin Higgins

Over 300 groups on Monday urged Senate leadership to reject a bill currently under consideration that would incentivize communities to sell off their public water supplies to private companies for pennies on the dollar.

Read More Show Less