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Watchfield Solar Park in England. RTPeat / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Simon Evans

During the three months of July, August and September, renewables generated an estimated total of 29.5 terawatt hours (TWh), compared with just 29.1TWh from fossil fuels, the analysis shows.

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By Marlene Cimons

Scientist Aaswath Raman long has been keen on discovering new sources of clean energy by creating novel materials that can make use of heat and light.

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A pronghorn runs through the Pinedale Anticline natural gas field in Wyoming in 2008. Theo Stein / USFWS

By Tara Lohan

In January 2015 North Dakota experienced one of the worst environmental disasters in its history: A pipeline burst, spilling nearly 3 million gallons of briny, saltwater waste from nearby oil-drilling operations into two creek beds. The wastewater, which flowed all the way to the Missouri River, contained chloride concentrations high enough to kill any wildlife that encountered it.

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Mario Gutiérrez / Moment / Getty Images

By Emily Long

Electric vehicles (EVs) are getting cheaper — so whether you're looking for a way to save on the hassle and cost of gas, shrink your carbon footprint, or simply zip around in a new Tesla, there are lots of reasons to consider a hybrid or electric car.

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Obama's EPA chief visited Los Angeles to get a first-hand view of LA River revitalization efforts in Nov 2013. Los Angeles District / Flickr

By Andrea Thompson

In the debate over how to respond to the perils posed by the earth's changing climate, the ground has been rapidly shifting in recent years: as the Trump administration has retreated from efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions and engage in climate diplomacy and public demand for action has grown — particularly among younger generations — cities and states have stepped into the breach.

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Well Blowout

By Julie Dermansky

A fracked natural gas well in northwest Louisiana has been burning for two weeks after suffering a blowout. A state official said the fire will likely burn for the next month before the flames can be brought under control by drilling a relief well.

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A defunct coal-fired power station near Johnson City, New York. DUNCAN RAWLINSON / Flickr

By Elana Sulakshana

It seems like every day there is a new story of a pipeline spilling crude oil or an oil refinery exploding. How do fossil fuel companies continue to operate such hazardous infrastructure in communities despite the immediate and long-term harm they cause? One piece of the answer is the coverage and financial support they get from insurance companies.

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Energy efficient led lamps at an exhibition. Yurou Guan / Moment / Getty Images

The Trump administration is rolling back energy efficiency standards for light bulbs that would have kept millions of tons of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, CNBC reported Wednesday.

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U.S. presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at a house party in Hampton Falls, New Hampshire on Sep. 2. Nic Antaya / The Boston Globe / Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren announced that she would adopt Gov. Jay Inslee's climate crisis plan and add in an $1 trillion in investments to help protect workers and to fund a dramatic shift in infrastructure away from fossil fuels if she is elected president, as CNN reported.

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Pixabay

By Jeff Deyette

One year ago this week, the California legislature passed landmark legislation committing the state's power providers to supplying 60 percent of their electricity from renewable energy by 2030 and setting a target of 100 percent clean, or carbon-free, power by mid century. It was a bold action that significantly raised the bar for other states considering policy action.

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A sow and her cubs at Tongass National Forest in Alaska, the planet's largest intact temperate rainforest. Forest Service Alaska

By Jake Johnson

President Donald Trump has reportedly ordered the U.S. Department of Agriculture to open Alaska's 16.7 million-acre Tongass National Forest — the planet's largest intact temperate rainforest — to logging and other corporate development projects, a move that comes as thousands of fires are ripping through the Amazon rainforest and putting the "lungs of the world" in grave danger.

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