Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Waterless Toilets, Flood-Resistant Homes and 8 More Sustainable Innovations in Buildings and Cities

Business

Editor’s note: This is part two of our look at various aspects of the Sustainia100. Here are parts onethreefourfive and six.

Buildings consume more than 40 percent of the world’s available energy, so it's no wonder they are a big focus of the Sustainia100, the newly released list of the 100 most sustainable projects and businesses in the world.

In the U.S. alone, scaling energy efficiency retrofits for buildings constitute a $279 billion investment opportunity, while the energy savings over the span of a decade could amount to more than $1 trillion. Clearly, Scandinavian think tank Sustainia and its committee of advisors needed to prioritize sustainable solutions at buildings all over the planet, along with innovative programs in cities to complement the more efficient structures they house.

Within the entire Sustainia100, there are 12 technologies that represent a wide array of smart technologies that increase the efficiency of buildings in terms of heating, cooling, lighting and water usage. Here are the 20 solutions and businesses that constitute the Buildings and Cities categories:

Buildings

  1. EcoNation: Mirror-enhanced skylight with no upfront costs
  2. Advantix Systems: Salt water air conditioners save energy in humid climates
  3. Haileybury Youth Trust: Alternative soil blocks for affordable construction
  4. View: Dynamic windows dim glass and save energy
  5. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: Daylight and natural ventilation in high-rise construction
  6. Snøhetta, Skanska, ZERO, Sapa, Hydro, Asplan Viak, and Entra Eiendom: Refurbishing to create energy-positive buildings
  7. Xella Baustoffe: Insulating building blocks from recyclable materials
  8. Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais and Partners in Health: Solar hospital safeguarding against power outage
  9. Practical Action: Flood-resistant housing in areas impacted by climate change
  10. Skanska and MetLife Stadium Co.

Cities

  1. Wecyclers: Providing incentives for recycling in low-income communities
  2. City and County of San Francisco Department of the Environment: Mobilizing behavior change for a zero-waste city
  3. Philips: Energy savings finance the switch to LED lighting in Washington D.C.
  4. Göteborg Energi, Lidköping Biogas, and Municipality of Lidköping: City drives innovation for liquefied biogas
  5. x-runner Venture: Waterless toilets for slums
  6. Biomatrix Water Solutions: Floating ecosystems for river restoration and water quality
  7. Power Plus Communications and partners: Communication platform for integrating renewable energy
  8. Smart Parking and Westminster City Council: Citywide parking sensors for lowering congestion
  9. National Asphalt Pavement Association: Porous asphalt for stormwater management
  10. City of Melbourne: Public-private partnership for citywide retrofitting

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Dr. Mark Brunswick (2R), Vice President of Regulatory Affairs and Quality, walks through the lab at Sorrento Therapeutics in San Diego, California on May 22. ARIANA DREHSLER / AFP / Getty Images

By Julia Ries

Around the world, there have been several cases of people recovering from COVID-19 only to later test positive again and appear to have another infection.

Read More Show Less

By Samantha Hepburn

In the expansion of its iron ore mine in Western Pilbara, Rio Tinto blasted the Juukan Gorge 1 and 2 — Aboriginal rock shelters dating back 46,000 years. These sites had deep historical and cultural significance.

Read More Show Less
Meadow Lake wind farm in Indiana. Anthony / CC BY-ND 2.0

By Tara Lohan

The first official tallies are in: Coronavirus-related shutdowns helped slash daily global emissions of carbon dioxide by 14 percent in April. But the drop won't last, and experts estimate that annual emissions of the greenhouse gas are likely to fall only about 7 percent this year.

Read More Show Less
Andrey Nikitin / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Adrienne Santos-Longhurst

Plants are awesome. They brighten up your space and give you a living thing you can talk to when there are no humans in sight.

Turns out, having enough of the right plants can also add moisture (aka humidify) indoor air, which can have a ton of health benefits.

Read More Show Less
A bald eagle chick inside a nest in Rutland, Massachusetts. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife
A bald eagle nest with eggs has been discovered in Cape Cod for the first time in 115 years, according to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (Mass Wildlife), as Newsweek reported.
Read More Show Less
The office of Rover.com sits empty with employees working from home due to the coronavirus pandemic on March 12 in Seattle, Washington. John Moore / Getty Images

The office may never look the same again. And the investment it will take to protect employees may force many companies to go completely remote. That's after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new recommendations for how workers can return to the office safely.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Frederic Edwin Church's The Icebergs reveal their danger as a crush vessel is in the foreground of an iceberg strewn sea, 1860. Buyenlarge / Getty Images

Scientists and art historians are studying art for signs of climate change and to better understand the ways Western culture's relationship to nature has been altered by it, according to the BBC.

Read More Show Less