Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Water Stress Could Affect Half the World's Population in Just 5 Years

Popular
Water Stress Could Affect Half the World's Population in Just 5 Years
A sea wall divides houses and the waters along the north Jakarta, Indonesia coast in this photo taken on July 12. BAGUS SARAGIH / AFP / Getty Images

World Water Week kicked off this week in the shadow of a frightening reality that nearly one-fourth of the world's population is living under extreme water stress and in just five years, half the world's population will live in water-stressed regions, according to the Weather Channel. The dire scenarios circle the globe, from New Mexico to New Delhi.


The misuse of groundwater in Indonesia is so grave that the capital city, Jakarta, is sinking, prompting the president there to move the seat of government to Borneo, as CNN reported.

In light of the pressing need to replenish the world's clean water systems, the 29th annual World Water Week started in Stockholm with the theme Water for Society: Including all. The event, which aims to draw the world's attention to water-related challenges around the world, is hosted by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and supported by the United Nations water programs. UN-Water publishes the annual World Water Development Report.

"Many in our societies are not aware of the vital role that water plays in realizing prosperity, eradicating poverty and tackling the climate crisis," said Torgny Holmgreen, SIWI's executive director in a press release. "Together, we can change that perception and unlock the potential of water-related solutions."

The meeting rooms teem with ideas and solutions as more than 260 sessions will be held over the six days of the conference, which includes more than 3,000 representatives from 100 countries, as the Weather Channel reported.

"We have the methods and the technology, but need the momentum to make them work," said Dr. Jackie King, Stockholm Water Prize Laureate 2019, according to a press release.

One area of focus this week is how large corporations consume water and what they can do to reduce their excess usage. The textile industry took the spotlight on the opening day, acknowledging outsized water use in its manufacturing. Cotton, for example, is a thirsty crop, and, it takes nearly 1,000 gallons of water to make just one pair of jeans, according to Lisa Hook, who works on sustainability for Gap Inc., as Reuters reported. She also acknowledged that her industry adds about 20 percent of the pollution in fresh water sources, especially in developing countries where labor is cheap and pollution standards are lax.

"Gap Inc. sees water as a human right," said Hook to Reuters. "We can't do business where there is no water."

Coca-Cola is turning to new technologies that clean bottles with air rather than water. It is harvesting rainwater at its plants. It's also looking to create new wetlands and to put back into nature an equal amount of water as it uses by next year, according to Reuters.

"Water is the absolute heart of our business. If we don't have water, we don't have a business — full stop," said Liz Lowe, the company's British sustainability manager, to Reuters.

PepsiCo has also taken the mantle of providing clean water to people in need. It has already delivered clean drinking water to more than 20 million people and teamed up with the Safe Water Network, Water.org, China Women's Development Foundation and the 2030 Water Resources Group of the World Bank, according to Forbes.

PepsiCo has also partnered with the Inter-American Development Bank to help support infrastructure projects in Latin America where nearly 230 million people do not have access to clean drinking water, as Forbes reported.

"At PepsiCo, we believe that access to safe water is a fundamental right — no matter where you live, no one should be left behind," said Roberta Barbieri who works in sustainability at PepsiCo, according to Forbes.

A replica of a titanosaur. AIZAR RALDES / AFP via Getty Images

New fossils uncovered in Argentina may belong to one of the largest animals to have walked on Earth.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Trump's Affordable Clean Energy rule eliminated a provision mandating that utilities move away from coal. VisionsofAmerica /Joe Sohm / Getty Images

A federal court on Tuesday struck down the Trump administration's rollback of the Obama-era Clean Power Plan regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A wild mink in Utah was the first wild animal in the U.S. found with COVID-19. Peter Trimming via Wikipedia, CC BY-SA

By Jonathan Runstadler and Kaitlin Sawatzki

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers have found coronavirus infections in pet cats and dogs and in multiple zoo animals, including big cats and gorillas. These infections have even happened when staff were using personal protective equipment.

Read More Show Less
A mass methane release could begin an irreversible path to full land-ice melt. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

By Peter Giger

The speed and scale of the response to COVID-19 by governments, businesses and individuals seems to provide hope that we can react to the climate change crisis in a similarly decisive manner - but history tells us that humans do not react to slow-moving and distant threats.

Read More Show Less
Doug Emhoff, U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden wave as they arrive on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

The period of the 45th presidency will go down as dark days for the United States — not just for the violent insurgency and impeachment that capped off Donald Trump's four years in office, but for every regressive action that came before.

Read More Show Less