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10 Vegan Sources of Probiotics

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By Katie Medlock

The importance of good gut health has been receiving more attention lately and for good reasons. By colonizing our guts with "good" bacteria, we can help improve our digestion, enhance our immune system, reduce our risk for contracting disease and even lose weight. An especially important way of achieving these health benefits is including probiotic-rich foods into our diet.

Perhaps the number one food associated with probiotics is yogurt, but vegans choose to reject dairy from their diets for health, environmental and ethical reasons. Plant-based eaters do not have to fear, however, because there are many foods which naturally contain health-boosting microorganisms.

Here are just a few delicious sources of vegan probiotics:

Miso

Tempeh

Sauerkraut

Kimchi

Kombucha

Vegan Yogurts and Kefir

Olives

Sourdough Bread

Sour Pickles

Supplements


This article was reposted with permission from our media associate Care2.

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