Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Texas Town Seeks Fracking Ban

Fracking

The Denton Drilling Awareness Group (Denton DAG) today announced they are collecting signatures for a ballot initiative to ban hydraulic fracturing within city limits. If approved by voters, Denton would become the first major Texas city to ban fracking, and the first city in the country to ban fracking after permits had been previously granted.

“The city and the state have repeatedly failed us,” said Maile Bush, whose family is impacted by fracking-enabled oil and gas development. “My family is breathing horrible fumes, we can’t enjoy our property and we’re trapped because no one else wants to live here. To protect our homes and our health, we’ve got no choice but to ban fracking.”

Denton DAG is comprised of members of the former Denton Drilling Advisory Group—which was formed at the request of a city government official to provide expert and public input while the city council developed drilling ordinances.

“We are out of options—the city is allowing fracking to happen right in our backyards,” said Denton DAG member Cathy McMullen. “When fracking-impacted residents call with problems, the city passes the buck.” 

To get on the ballot, fracking-ban supporters must gather 571 signatures within 180 days. Denton DAG members have reason to expect they can exceed that mark, as increasing numbers of Denton residents are concerned about fracking in their neighborhoods.

“I’ve been working with Denton residents since 2009 trying to get the city to pass regulations that would allow drilling and still protect community health,” said Earthworks’ Texas Organizer Sharon Wilson.

“Enough is enough," continued Wilson. "When this ban passes, the fracking industry will have its own bad behavior, and city’s stonewalling, to blame.”

Hundreds of municipalities across the country have passed bans or moratoriums on fracking, but none with the extent of fracking already occurring as Denton. There are more than 270 active gas wells within the city limits of Denton. Only new fracking operations would be banned by this initiative, active wells would keep operating.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less
Protesters face off against security during the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

In just two weeks, three states have passed laws criminalizing protests against fossil fuel infrastructure.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Donald Trump and Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listen to White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx speak in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

President Donald Trump has bowed to the advice of public health experts and extended social distancing measures designed to slow the spread of the new coronavirus till at least April 30.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Charli Shield

At unsettling times like the coronavirus outbreak, it might feel like things are very much out of your control. Most routines have been thrown into disarray and the future, as far as the experts tell us, is far from certain.

Read More Show Less
Pie Ranch in San Mateo, California, is a highly diverse farm that has both organic and food justice certification. Katie Greaney

By Elizabeth Henderson

Farmworkers, farmers and their organizations around the country have been singing the same tune for years on the urgent need for immigration reform. That harmony turns to discord as soon as you get down to details on how to get it done, what to include and what compromises you are willing to make. Case in point: the Farm Workforce Modernization Act (H.R. 5038), which passed in the House of Representatives on Dec. 11, 2019, by a vote of 260-165. The Senate received the bill the next day and referred it to the Committee on the Judiciary, where it remains. Two hundred and fifty agriculture and labor groups signed on to the United Farm Workers' (UFW) call for support for H.R. 5038. UFW President Arturo Rodriguez rejoiced:

Read More Show Less