Quantcast
Business

Tesla + Airbnb Pave Way for Cross-Country Supercharger Network

Airbnb and Tesla Motors are "giving travelers a new way to get away." Last week, the companies announced a partnership that will bring charging stations to select homes across the globe, starting with the California coast. "Together, we’re building a world with no limits to how far you can travel and how you get there," says Airbnb. "From remote deserts to lush forests, we’re unlocking highways, backroads, adventures and unique homes."

Sounds great, but how does it work? Airbnb hosts that are interested in adding a Tesla charger to their home can apply to have a charger installed in their home. To qualify for the initial phase, hosts must live in California, have five verified bookings and a rating of higher than four stars. If you are selected by Tesla, they will cover the cost of the charger but you have to cover the cost of the installation. Then, Airbnb will list you as a "Tesla-ready property" on their site, so Tesla drivers know that they can charge up while they stay with you. It only take a few hours for Tesla's Model S to charge to its full 270-mile range.

Tesla and Airbnb have partnered up to bring charging stations to Airbnb rentals. Photo credit: Airbnb

Now Tesla drivers can plan where they stay according to which Airbnb rentals have charging stations. Photo credit: Airbnb

To be as user-friendly as possible, Zachary Shahan at Clean Technica suggests that Airbnb add the "Tesla-ready property" as a symbol in the amenities section on a listing, which looks like this:

The partnership is all part of Tesla's efforts to expand charging stations for its electric vehicles to combat "range anxiety," the fear among drivers that electric vehicles can't go far enough between charges. Charging stations will be installed at a minimum of 100 Airbnb properties, including 30 high-end ones, during the first phase. To date, Tesla has a total of 499 Supercharger Stations and 2,810 Superchargers worldwide, along with several destination chargers and home plug-in chargers.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Kids Explain to Adults Why We Should Repower Our Schools With 100% Renewable Energy

World’s First Solar Powered Airport Has Arrived

America’s First Hemp House Pulls CO2 From the Air

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Business
Jean-Paul Gaultier talks to French model Cindy Bruna in his workshop in Paris on July 1. ALAIN JOCARD / AFP / Getty Images

Jean Paul Gaultier Drops Fur, Calls Industry 'Absolutely Deplorable'

Another top fashion designer has pledged to ditch animal fur.

During a live appearance on the French television channel Bonsoir!, Jean Paul Gaultier said will no longer use the material in his collections.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Westend61 / Getty Images

EcoWatch Gratitude Photo Contest: Submit Now!

EcoWatch is pleased to announce its first photo contest! Show us what in nature you are most thankful for this Thanksgiving. Whether you have a love for oceans, animals, or parks, we want to see your best photos that capture what you love about this planet.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
The battlefield of Verdun is part of France's Zone Rouge, cordoned off since the end of WWI. Oeuvre personnelle / Wikimedia Commons

This World War I Battlefield Is a Haunting Reminder of the Environmental Costs of War

World War I ended 100 years ago on Sunday, but 42,000 acres in northeast France serve as a living memorial to the human and environmental costs of war.

The battle of Verdun was the longest continuous conflict in the Great War, and it so devastated the land it took place on that, after the war, the government cordoned it off-limits to human habitation. What was once farmland became the Zone Rouge, or Red Zone, as National Geographic reported.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
Waves from the Atlantic Ocean crash against a scenic beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This sandy peninsula is a popular summer vacation destination and is also known for its many Great White sharks. Velvetfish / iStock / Getty Images

Cape Cod’s Gray Seal and White Shark Problem Is Anything but Black-and-White

By Jason Bittel

On a sunny Saturday in mid-September, 26-year-old Arthur Medici was boogie-boarding in the waves off Wellfleet, Massachusetts, when a great white shark bit his leg. Despite the efforts of a friend who pulled him ashore and the paramedics who rushed him to the hospital, Medici died from his injuries. It's about as tragic a story as you can imagine: a young life cut short due to a freak run-in with a wild animal.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Renewable Energy
Max Pixel

Koch Industries Lobbies Against Electric Vehicle Tax Credit

By Dana Drugmand

Koch Industries is calling for the elimination of tax credits for electric vehicles (EVs), all while claiming that it does not oppose plug-in cars and inviting the elimination of oil and gas subsidies that the petroleum conglomerate and its industry peers receive.

Outgoing Nevada Republican Senator Dean Heller introduced a bill in September that would lift the sales cap on electric vehicles eligible for a federal tax credit, and replace the cap with a deadline that would dictate when the credit would start being phased out.

Keep reading... Show less
Pexels

10 Things You Always Wanted to Know About Neonics

By Daniel Raichel

As massive numbers of bees and other pollinators keep dying across the globe, study after study continues to connect these deaths to neonicotinoid pesticides (A.K.A. "neonics"). With the science piling up, and other countries starting to take critical pollinator-saving action, here's a quick primer on all things neonics:

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Health
Judita Juknele / EyeEm / Getty Images

Lyme Disease Expected to Surge

By Marlene Cimons

German physician Alfred Buchwald had no clue that the chronic skin inflammation he described in 1883 was the first recorded case of a serious tick-carrying disease, one that would take hold in a small Connecticut town almost a century later and go on to afflict people across the U.S.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
Black rhino. Gerry Zambonini / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

China Restores Rhino and Tiger Parts Ban After International Fury

Great news from China! Following intense international backlash, the Chinese government said Monday that it has postponed a regulation that would have allowed the use of tiger bone and rhino horn for medicine, research and other purposes.

In October, China alarmed animal rights activists around the world when it weakened a 25-year-old ban on the trading of the animal parts. Conservationists said it would be akin to signing a "death warrant" for endangered tiger and rhino populations.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!