Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
The U.S. Department of Transportation has called for more research leading to new guidelines for safer intersections, crosswalks, lights, and more. georgeclerk / Getty Images

Walking to work or to the store is better for the climate than driving, so climate advocates encourage people to leave their cars at home when possible.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A FedEx truck travels along Interstate 10 by the San Gorgonio Pass Wind Farm near Palm Springs, California on Feb. 27, 2019. Robert Alexander / Getty Images

FedEx's entire parcel pickup and delivery fleet will become 100 percent electric by 2040, according to a statement released Wednesday. The ambitious plan includes checkpoints, such as aiming for 50 percent electric vehicles by 2025.

Read More Show Less
Xsandra / Getty Images

Looking for ways to cut down on single-use plastic while grocery shopping? You may already have eco-friendly shopping bags, but bringing your own reusable produce bags is another easy swap.

According to the UN Environment Program, up to 5 trillion single-use plastic bags are used globally each year, and because of the material they're made from, most municipal recycling centers don't accept them (more on this below).

The most sustainable option is to skip the bag altogether. You can also make your own reusable produce bags out of old T-shirts. But if you'd rather purchase them new, here are our recommendations for the best reusable produce bags on the market today.

Read More Show Less
Empty freeways, such as this one in LA, were a common sight during COVID-19 lockdowns in spring 2020. vlvart / Getty Images

Lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic had the added benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around seven percent, or 2.6 billion metric tons, in 2020.

Read More Show Less

Trending

An electric vehicle is plugged in to an EV charging station at a Walmart parking lot in Duarte, California on Sept. 14, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Six major U.S. electricity utilities will collaborate to build a massive EV charging network across 16 states, they announced Tuesday.

Read More Show Less

Tearing through the crowded streets of Philadelphia, an electric car and a gas-powered car sought to win a heated race. One that mimicked how cars are actually used. The cars had to stop at stoplights, wait for pedestrians to cross the street, and swerve in and out of the hundreds of horse-drawn buggies. That's right, horse-drawn buggies. Because this race took place in 1908. It wanted to settle once and for all which car was the superior urban vehicle. Although the gas-powered car was more powerful, the electric car was more versatile. As the cars passed over the finish line, the defeat was stunning. The 1908 Studebaker electric car won by 10 minutes. If in 1908, the electric car was clearly the better form of transportation, why don't we drive them now? Today, I'm going to answer that question by diving into the history of electric cars and what I discovered may surprise you.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

Countries most vulnerable to climate change are often the ones with the least financial resources to respond, and rich countries, which are accountable for the majority of global greenhouse gas emissions, are failing to support them.

Read More Show Less
Activists raise their concerns outside the Department for Work and Pensions in London on Feb. 8, 2021 about the treatment of activists who are in a tunnel beneath Euston Station to stop the high-speed train project HS2. Kristian Buus / In Pictures / Getty Images

By Dan Ashby and Lucy Taylor

Beneath London's Euston Station, climate protester Blue Sandford is chained by the ankle in an illegally dug tunnel. The tunnel, 12-feet deep and 100ft long, is wet and muddy. It is propped up by wooden frames: in places wide enough only for them to lie flat on their stomachs.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A recent study finds that superyachts emit the most carbon emissions. xefstock / Getty Images

By Richard Wilk and Beatriz Barros

Tesla's Elon Musk and Amazon's Jeff Bezos have been vying for the world's richest person ranking all year after the former's wealth soared a staggering US$160 billion in 2020, putting him briefly in the top spot.

Read More Show Less
EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Elliot Negin

There has been a spike in good news recently when it comes to the future of electric vehicles (EVs). That's encouraging, given the transportation sector is now the largest source of US carbon emissions and vehicles are the main culprits.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A platform at the Christopher Street PATH station had the worst air pollution ever measured at a subway station. Billie Grace Ward / CC BY 2.0

It turns out, the subway is even dirtier than you imagined, at least in the four U.S. cities that make up the majority of the country's underground transport system.

Read More Show Less
People walk in Helsingborg, Sweden on July 26, 2020. Dan-Manila / iStock Editorial / Getty Images Plus
If you took the cars away, what could you fit in a parking space?
Read More Show Less
A new report from the Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund notes that most school buses in the U.S. run on diesel, a fossil fuel linked to numerous health problems. FatCamera / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

While some students are still learning remotely or on hybrid schedules due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the climate emergency hasn't suddenly disappeared because of the devastating public health crisis—meaning neither has the need to radically and rapidly transform society.

Read More Show Less