Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

How Do We Solve a Problem Like Wildlife Trade?

Animals
An illegally trafficked tiger skull and pelt. Ryan Moehring / USFWS

By John R. Platt

When it comes to solving problems related to wildlife trade, there are an awful lot of "sticky widgets."


That's what Eli Weiss, founder of the WildiZe Foundation and host of the "Our Wild World" podcast, calls some of the most pressing issues related to legal and illegal wildlife trafficking. These big questions — which often have no easy answers — include the fate of the nearly extinct vaquita, the future of farmed rhinos, the hidden threat to giraffes, and potential new roles for (and threats to) the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

We discussed these issues — and a whole lot more — in a wide-ranging conversation on the podcast that aired Nov. 4. Check it out below:

Reposted with permission from The Revelator.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A record-sized hole has opened in the ozone layer over the Arctic, The Guardian reported Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Heavy industry on the lower Mississippi helps to create dead zones. AJ Wallace on Unsplash.

Cutting out coal-burning and other sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy industry, electricity production and traffic will reduce the size of the world's dead zones along coasts where all fish life is vanishing because of a lack of oxygen.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

Despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has restricted the ability to gather in peaceful assembly, a Canadian company has moved forward with construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
A gas flare from the Shell Chemical LP petroleum refinery illuminates the sky on August 21, 2019 in Norco, Louisiana. Drew Angerer / Getty Images.

Methane levels in the atmosphere experienced a dramatic rise in 2019, preliminary data released Sunday shows.

Read More Show Less
A retired West Virginia miner suffering from black lung visits a doctor for tests. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

In some states like West Virginia, coal mines have been classified as essential services and are staying open during the COVID-19 pandemic, even though the close quarters miners work in and the known risks to respiratory health put miners in harm's way during the spread of the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less