Quantcast

Rocket Trike Diaries—Week Four

Energy

Tom Weis

Welcome to Rocket Trike Diaries—a 10 week video tour of the 2011 "Ride for Renewables: No Tar Sands Oil On American Soil!" Join Renewable Rider Tom Weis as he pedals his rocket trike 2,150 miles through America’s heartland in support of landowners fighting TransCanada’s toxic Keystone XL tar sands pipeline scheme. Here are the video entries from Week Four:

Video Entry #23: Hannah & Friends Unite Against Keystone XL

Renewable Rider Tom Weis, Alex White Plume, Daryl Hannah & Paul Siemens discuss why they are united in their opposition to Keystone XL. Weis talks about how Dr. James Hansen, the nation's top climate scientist, was recently arrested outside the White House, when he should have been invited inside to brief the president: "What's wrong with this picture?"

Video Entry #24: Hannah, Weis & White Plume Talk Keystone XL Corruption

Renewable Rider Tom Weis, Daryl Hannah & Oglala Lakota elder Alex White Plume discuss corrupt dealings between the U.S. government and TransCanada. Daryl takes the oil lobby to task for their unethical and misleading "ethical oil" advertising campaign.

Video Entry #25: Oglala Lakota Matriarch to Obama: "Stop This Pipeline."

Ron Seifert hears Oglala Lakota matriarch Debra White Plume talk about her responsibility as a mother and grandmother to defend our water for future generations. She urges all human beings to tell President Obama he must defend the land, water and people of this country against TransCanada and their tar sands pipeline.

Video Entry #26: Oglala Elder to TransCanada: "I Fear Nothing."

Renewable Rider Tom Weis hears Oglala Lakota Buffalo Chief Floyd Hand talk about uniting with ranchers and farmers peacefully to fight Keystone XL. As an Oglala Sioux warrior, Floyd says he fears nothing: "I will lay down my life for my children."

Video Entry #27: Wyoming Rancher: "Mother Earth Needs You"

Renewable Rider Tom Weis hears Wyoming rancher Eric Ringsby talk about why he joined the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance" on horseback with Lakota tribal leaders & Daryl Hannah. Eric urges Americans to heed the call: "Mother Earth needs you to wake up, start thinking for yourself and make a difference."

Video Entry #28: Lakota Matriarch on Keystone XL: "This is a Fight for Survival."

Renewable Rider Tom Weis hears Oglala Lakota matriarch Regina Brave describe her people's treaty stand (Ft. Laramie Treaty of 1868) against Keystone XL. Regina warns that contaminating the Ogallala Aquifer will destroy the future of our children and grandchildren. Calling this "a time to show unity as Americans against this pipeline," she says, "Money can pass through your hands like water, but the land is forever."

Video Entry #29: Lakota Elder Shares Native Wisdom with Daryl Hannah

Ron Seifert listens to Oglala Lakota elder Alex White Plume share with Daryl Hannah how TransCanada's Keystone XL tar sands pipeline would threaten the spiritual healing of the Lakota people by violating a sacred death trail the Lakota travel to deal with historical grief and trauma. Alex translates the meaning of Lakota for Daryl: La ("love and compassion") Ko ("to include everybody") Ta ("toward the ancient ways").

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Gretchen Goldman

The Independent Particulate Matter Review Panel has released their consensus recommendations to the EPA administrator on the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter. The group of 20 independent experts, that were disbanded by Administrator Wheeler last October and reconvened last week, hosted by the Union of Concerned Scientists, has now made clear that the current particulate pollution standards don't protect public health and welfare.

Read More Show Less
An African elephant is pictured on November 19, 2012, in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. MARTIN BUREAU / AFP / Getty Images

The unprecedented drought that has caused a water crisis in Zimbabwe has now claimed the life of at least 55 elephants since September, according to a wildlife spokesman, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Maria Dornelas.

By John C. Cannon

Life is reshuffling itself at an unsettling clip across Earth's surface and in its oceans, a new study has found.

Read More Show Less
An Exxon station in Florida remains open despite losing its roof during Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 29, 2005. Florida Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Shaun Withers

The country's largest fossil fuel company goes on trial today to face charges that it lied to investors about the safety of its assets in the face of the climate crisis and potential legislation to fight it, as the AP reported.

Read More Show Less
El Niño's effect on Antarctica is seen in a tabular iceberg off of Thwaites ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck / NASA

El Niños are getting stronger due to climate change, according to a new study in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Julia Ries

  • Antibiotic resistance has doubled in the last 20 years.
  • Additionally a new study found one patient developed resistance to a last resort antibiotic in a matter of weeks.
  • Health experts say antibiotic prescriptions should only be given when absolutely necessary in order to avoid growing resistance.

Over the past decade, antibiotic resistance has emerged as one of the greatest public health threats.

Read More Show Less
Pexels


There are hundreds of millions of acres of public land in the U.S., but not everyone has had the chance to hike in a national forest or picnic in a state park.

Read More Show Less
Workers attend to a rooftop solar panel project on May 14, 2017 in Wuhan, China. Kevin Frayer / Getty Images

By Simon Evans

Renewable sources of electricity are set for rapid growth over the next five years, which could see them match the output of the world's coal-fired power stations for the first time ever.

Read More Show Less