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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
Oil and chemical refinery plants cover the landscape next to African American communities along the Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

By Derrick Z. Jackson

The Trump administration is trying mightily to gut the 50-year-old National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the law that mandates rigorous, science-based environmental impact reviews for major infrastructure and construction projects prior to federal permitting. NEPA also reserves significant time for the public to weigh in on the impact of projects to their communities.

The loss of public input in the administration's proposed changes to NEPA has environmental justice leaders up in arms. For them, the silencing amounts to regulatory racism.

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View of asbestos warning signs at the Turner Construction project in downtown Bellevue, Washington in December 2019. Colleen Michaels / iStock Editorial / Getty Images

By Derrick Z. Jackson

In the U.S., gun violence kills nearly 40,000 people a year and has killed nearly 40,000 or so children and teenagers since 1999, and yet the nation is still without serious gun control. Another 40,000 people die each year in traffic accidents, including 1,200 children 14 and under. Yet we eschew policies used abroad that could cut the toll by half.

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A gas flare from the Shell Chemical LP petroleum refinery on Aug. 21, 2019 in Norco, Louisiana. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

One of the more positive environmental developments in the U.S. in recent years has been the shutdown of deadly, high-emitting coal-fired plants. But now, a study has found that new oil and gas infrastructure could counteract much of that progress.

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Banners for the event hanging in Buckingham County Middle School gym by Friends of Buckingham, a community group that fought the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, leading to this victory. Katja Timm / VCU Capital News Service / CC BY-NC 2.0

A historic African American community in Virginia has dealt another blow to the embattled Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

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Apartment blocks of a public housing project pictured in Harlem, New York City. Terraxplorer / iStock / Getty Images

Residents of ethnic minority neighborhoods are paying more for utilities than people living in majority-white neighborhoods, regardless of socioeconomic status, new research shows.

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Francia Márquez told Earthjustice that "humanity's greatest challenge is to either work together to preserve this planet or destroy it."

Earthjustice

By Robert Valencia

In April 2018, Afro-Colombian activist Francia Márquez won the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, thanks to her work to retake her community's ancestral territories from illegal gold mining. However, her international recognition comes at a very risky price.

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Hazardous materials strewn throughout the neighborhood in Watts, California. Better Watts Initiative

By Daniel Ross

For decades, the South Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts has been hemmed in by dangerous pollutants.

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