Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Rocket Trike Diaries—Week Eight

Energy

Tom Weis

Welcome to Rocket Trike Diaries—a 10 week video tour of the 2011 "Ride for Renewables: No Tar Sands Oil On American Soil!" Join Renewable Rider Tom Weis as he pedals his rocket trike 2,150 miles through America’s heartland in support of landowners fighting TransCanada’s toxic Keystone XL tar sands pipeline scheme. Here are the video entries from Week Eight:

Video Entry #51: Riders Discover Apparent Cushing, OK Tie-In for Keystone XL

Renewable Rider Tom Weis and Ron Seifert discover what appears to be the Oklahoma tie-in for the Keystone XL pipeline in Cushing, Okla. The location matches descriptions provided by locals; surveyors are working on the property; and sections of pipe are assembled on the ground. Describing the day as "soul crushing" and the area as an industrial "dead zone," with an "overwhelming" stench of gas in the area in some parts, Ron imagines how different it would feel to be standing next to a wind farm or field of solar arrays.

Video Entry #52: U.S. Senator James Inhofe: Member of Flat Earth Society?

Renewable Rider Tom Weis and Ron Seifert race a snowstorm towards Coalgate, Okla., with more than 100 miles behind them on the day. Reflecting on the clownish behavior of U.S. Senator James Inhofe (R-OK), Tom wonders aloud whether Inhofe is truly in denial over the climate crisis, or if he's simply a tool of the fossil fool/fuel industry. The latter would suggest he cares more about staying in office than protecting the future of his children and grandchildren, something that could actually be said about most members of Congress. Time for an Occupy Congress movement?

Video Entry #53: World's Smallest 3-Piece Chicken Dinner

Renewable Rider Tom Weis asks Ron Seifert to remove the lid from a box discovered on the counter of Beverly's Country Kitchen in Jacksonville, Texas. Inside is the world's smallest 3-piece chicken dinner.

Video Entry #54: Why Is Rick Perry Letting a Foreign Corporation Mess With Texas?

Renewable Rider Tom Weis and Ron Seifert pedal through chilly north Texas after meeting with an "old school" reporter at The Paris News. For the first time in four days, the sun is out. Tom poses a pointed question to Texas Gov. Rick Perry: "For someone who prides yourself on law and order, why are you letting a foreign corporation mess with Texas?"

Video Entry #55: Texas Business Owner: "It's Our Country and It's Time We Take It Back."

Renewable Rider Tom Weis speaks with Amy Fikes, co-owner of Phoenix Rising, a women-owned local business devoted to all natural products in Sulphur Springs, Texas. Amy says she is "definitely against the pipeline" and discusses the "wonderful, great solutions" our nation has available to us: wind, solar, algae for fuel. She praises the success of local activists in shutting down local coal mines and coal burning by energy giant, Luminant.

Video Entry #56: 92 Year Old Texas Man: Keystone XL is "Un-American"

Renewable Rider Tom Weis hears 92-year old Furman Boles explain why he is giving everything he can of himself to fight Keystone XL: "I believe it is the right thing to do." Furman calls the pipeline proposal "un-American," saying TransCanada has "lied all the way." Describing the act of protecting "God's green earth" as "patriotic," he says of TransCanada, "They don't have any business over here stomping on our ground and cutting our trees down." He says he loves "everything that has life in it" and is "for the environment" and "against abuses of eminent domain." Expressing concern for "critters" and "young folks," he explains, "All my life, I've been living it up. I've only got a limited time now to try to live it down." Furman poignantly describes how he plans to build his own coffin so he can "go green in the grave," but makes it clear he's not ready to go yet: "I got a lot of work to do."

Video Entry #57: Texas Landowner (Part II): TransCanada Treating Family Like "Lab Rat"

Renewable Rider Tom Weis and Ron Seifert get a walking tour of David Daniel's wooded homestead in Winnsboro, Texas. The property he and his wife fell in love with, and dream of passing on to their 4-year old daughter, would be split in half by TransCanada's toxic tar sands pipeline. Four fresh water springs fall within the construction zone. David describes the moment he found the first survey stake on his property: "My heart just dropped." He shares a story of approaching five "jittery" TransCanada surveyors who had been illegally trespassing on his property and "took off running." He describes meeting with people sickened by toxins from Michigan's Kalamazoo River tar sands oil spill, saying TransCanada, which doesn't have an emergency response plan, is treating his family like a "lab rat." He talks about how company representatives regularly engage in "bold faced lying" and the toll the 3 ½ year fight has taken on their lives: "The disrespect for our lives, and the lives of our daughter and the resources is just unacceptable." David, his family, and everyone else living up and down the pipeline route need the American people to come to their defense.

Visit EcoWatch's KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
A baby receives limited treatment at a hospital in Yemen on June 27, 2020. Mohammed Hamoud / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Oxfam International warned Thursday that up to 12,000 people could die each day by the end of the year as a result of hunger linked to the coronavirus pandemic—a daily death toll surpassing the daily mortality rate from Covid-19 itself.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2006 oil spill was the largest incident in Philippine history and damaged 1,600 acres of mangrove forests. Shubert Ciencia / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jun N. Aguirre

An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country's largest spill in 2006.

Read More Show Less